Posts Tagged: Open


22
Feb 11

Texas Senate Race Wide Open

A new University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll finds David Dewhurst (R) leading the Republican race for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) with 27%, followed by Michael Williams (R) at 5% and several other potential candidates with even less support.

On the Democratic side, Chris Bell (D) leads with 16%, followed by Chet Edwards (D) at 13% and John Sharp (D) at 12%.
Taegan Goddard’s Political Wire


22
Feb 11

Chicago candidates hit the streets as polls open amid snow

Chicago, Illinois (CNN) – Amid a snowfall of a couple of inches, voters headed to the polls Tuesday morning to elect their first new mayor since 1989.

Candidates were hitting the streets hoping to rally voters. Frontrunner Rahm Emanuel, who previously cast his ballot in early voting, was shaking hands at an “L” train stop Tuesday morning while Gery Chico was hitting some polling stations and will vote later Tuesday morning. Carol Moseley Braun was going to her polling place to cast her ballot. Miguel del Valle, who also early voted, was also visiting polling stations throughout the city.

The city’s board of elections is predicting a turnout of about 50 percent – which would be higher than some recent mayoral contests but not as high as the headed elections in the 1980s.
Asked if the snow might decrease turnout, elections board spokesman Jim Allen said no: “This is a mild dusting. We are tougher than that.”


CNN Political Ticker


22
Feb 11

Tuesday Open Thread: Washington Edition

Today, in 1732, George Washington was born.


Big Government


22
Feb 11

Tuesday Open Thread

Today, we’ll learn something about href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Box_Brown”>Henry ‘ Box’ Brown, a slave who mailed himself to freedom.

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/tuesday-open-thread-136/henry_box_brown/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30800″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/henry_box_brown.jpg” alt=”” title=”henry_box_brown” width=”500″ height=”352″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30800″ />

Henry “Box” Brown (1815-1879?) was a 19th century Virginia slave who escaped to freedom by arranging to have himself mailed to Philadelphia abolitionists in a wooden crate. For a short time he became a noted abolitionist speaker and later a showman, but later lost the support of the abolitionist community, notably Frederick Douglass, who wished Brown had kept quiet about his escape so that more slaves could have escaped using similar means.

Biography

Born into slavery in 1815 in Louisa County, Virginia, Brown was sent to Richmond in 1830 to work in a tobacco factory. There, he married another slave, Nancy, and the couple had three children. Brown used his wages to pay Nancy’s master for the time she spent caring for them. However, in 1848, his wife and children were sold to a slave trader and sent to North Carolina. Brown claimed that he was powerless to prevent this.

With the help of James C. A. Smith and a sympathetic white storekeeper named Samuel Smith (no relation), Brown devised a plan to have himself shipped to a free state by Adams Express Co. Brown paid $ 86 (out of his savings of $ 166) to Smith, who contacted Philadelphia abolitionist James Miller McKim, who agreed to receive the box. Brown burned his hand with oil of vitriol as an excuse for missing work.

During the trip, which began on March 23, 1849, Brown’s box traveled by wagon, railroad, steamboat, wagon again, railroad, ferry, railroad, and finally delivery wagon. Several times during the 27-hour journey, carriers placed the box upside-down or handled it roughly, but Brown was able to remain still enough to avoid detection.

The box containing Brown was received by McKim, William Still, and other members of the Philadelphia Vigilance Committee. When Brown was released, one of those present remembered his first words as “How do you do, gentlemen?” He then sang a psalm from the Bible he had previously selected for his moment of freedom.

Brown became a well-known speaker for the Anti-Slavery Society. He was bestowed the nickname of “Box” at a Boston antislavery convention in May 1849, and thereafter used the name Henry Box Brown. He published two versions of his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown; first in Boston in 1849 and the second in Manchester, England in 1851. Brown exhibited a moving panorama titled “Mirror of Slavery” in the northeastern United States until he was forced to move to England after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. Brown toured Britain with his antislavery panorama for the next 10 years, performing several hundred times a year and visiting virtually every town and city over that period.

Brown stayed on the British show circuit for twenty-five years, until 1875. In the 1860s, he began performing as a mesmerist, and some time after that as a conjuror, under the show names Prof. H. Box Brown and the African Prince. Leaving his first wife and children in slavery (though he had the means to purchase their freedom) (see Ruggles); he married a second time, to a white British woman, and began a new family. In 1875, he returned to the U.S. with a family magic act. There is also a later report of the Brown Family Jubilee Singers.

The cause and date of his death are unknown.

Legacy

The Resurrection of Henry Box Brown at Philadelphia, a lithograph by Samuel Rowse, depicted Henry Brown emerging from the shipping box into freedom in Philadelphia. The lithograph was published to help raise funds to produce Brown’s anti-slavery panorama. One of only three known originals is preserved in the collection of the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond.

There is a monument to Henry “Box” Brown along the Canal Walk in downtown Richmond, Virginia in the form of a metal reproduction of the box in which Brown escaped.

Good Morning.

As you go through your day, don’t forget JJP.

Drop those links. Engage in debate. Give us trivia and gossip too.

And always, have a peaceful day.


Jack & Jill Politics


22
Feb 11

Tuesday Open Thread

Today, we’ll learn something about href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Box_Brown”>Henry ‘ Box’ Brown, a slave who mailed himself to freedom.

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/tuesday-open-thread-136/henry_box_brown/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30800″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/henry_box_brown.jpg” alt=”” title=”henry_box_brown” width=”500″ height=”352″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30800″ />

Henry “Box” Brown (1815-1879?) was a 19th century Virginia slave who escaped to freedom by arranging to have himself mailed to Philadelphia abolitionists in a wooden crate. For a short time he became a noted abolitionist speaker and later a showman, but later lost the support of the abolitionist community, notably Frederick Douglass, who wished Brown had kept quiet about his escape so that more slaves could have escaped using similar means.

Biography

Born into slavery in 1815 in Louisa County, Virginia, Brown was sent to Richmond in 1830 to work in a tobacco factory. There, he married another slave, Nancy, and the couple had three children. Brown used his wages to pay Nancy’s master for the time she spent caring for them. However, in 1848, his wife and children were sold to a slave trader and sent to North Carolina. Brown claimed that he was powerless to prevent this.

With the help of James C. A. Smith and a sympathetic white storekeeper named Samuel Smith (no relation), Brown devised a plan to have himself shipped to a free state by Adams Express Co. Brown paid $ 86 (out of his savings of $ 166) to Smith, who contacted Philadelphia abolitionist James Miller McKim, who agreed to receive the box. Brown burned his hand with oil of vitriol as an excuse for missing work.

During the trip, which began on March 23, 1849, Brown’s box traveled by wagon, railroad, steamboat, wagon again, railroad, ferry, railroad, and finally delivery wagon. Several times during the 27-hour journey, carriers placed the box upside-down or handled it roughly, but Brown was able to remain still enough to avoid detection.

The box containing Brown was received by McKim, William Still, and other members of the Philadelphia Vigilance Committee. When Brown was released, one of those present remembered his first words as “How do you do, gentlemen?” He then sang a psalm from the Bible he had previously selected for his moment of freedom.

Brown became a well-known speaker for the Anti-Slavery Society. He was bestowed the nickname of “Box” at a Boston antislavery convention in May 1849, and thereafter used the name Henry Box Brown. He published two versions of his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown; first in Boston in 1849 and the second in Manchester, England in 1851. Brown exhibited a moving panorama titled “Mirror of Slavery” in the northeastern United States until he was forced to move to England after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. Brown toured Britain with his antislavery panorama for the next 10 years, performing several hundred times a year and visiting virtually every town and city over that period.

Brown stayed on the British show circuit for twenty-five years, until 1875. In the 1860s, he began performing as a mesmerist, and some time after that as a conjuror, under the show names Prof. H. Box Brown and the African Prince. Leaving his first wife and children in slavery (though he had the means to purchase their freedom) (see Ruggles); he married a second time, to a white British woman, and began a new family. In 1875, he returned to the U.S. with a family magic act. There is also a later report of the Brown Family Jubilee Singers.

The cause and date of his death are unknown.

Legacy

The Resurrection of Henry Box Brown at Philadelphia, a lithograph by Samuel Rowse, depicted Henry Brown emerging from the shipping box into freedom in Philadelphia. The lithograph was published to help raise funds to produce Brown’s anti-slavery panorama. One of only three known originals is preserved in the collection of the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond.

There is a monument to Henry “Box” Brown along the Canal Walk in downtown Richmond, Virginia in the form of a metal reproduction of the box in which Brown escaped.

Good Morning.

As you go through your day, don’t forget JJP.

Drop those links. Engage in debate. Give us trivia and gossip too.

And always, have a peaceful day.

Jack & Jill Politics


22
Feb 11

Open Thread

uncle-sam-socialism.jpg

Via The Waking Giant, on a tip from AC.

Moonbattery


21
Feb 11

Monday Open Thread

Today is President’s Day, so we can celebrate it, and Black History Month at the same time. /> rel=”attachment wp-att-30772″ href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/monday-open-thread-135/presidents-of-the-united-states-3/”> class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30772″ title=”presidents of the united states-3″ src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/presidents-of-the-united-states-3.jpg” alt=”” width=”535″ height=”410″ />

Good Morning.

As you begin a new week, don’t forget JJP.

Drop those links. Engage in debate.

Give us trivia and gossip too.

And always, have a peaceful day.


Jack & Jill Politics


21
Feb 11

Afternoon Open Thread

under THEY ARE WHO WE THOUGHT THEY WERE:

href=”http://www.balloon-juice.com/2011/02/20/maps-to-consider/#comment-2439430″>Balloon Juice has done a couple of excellent posts about the happenings in Wisconsin. /> Follow the maps:

A few days ago, Josh Marshall over at TPM published a map of how various States treat collective bargaining for public employees’ unions:

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/collective-bargaining-by-state/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30779″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/collective-bargaining-by-state.jpg” alt=”” title=”collective bargaining by state” width=”500″ height=”393″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30779″ />

Deeper pattens emerge when you look at a map of Free States and Slave States as of 1857 when the Dred Scott Decision opened all US Territories (and all Free States) to Slavery:

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/dred-scott/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30780″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/dred-scott.jpg” alt=”” title=”dred scott” width=”500″ height=”385″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30780″ />

What thing becomes clear—as you consider the modern Republican Confederate Party’s effort to attack workers, Unions, the Middle Class and their rights—is that their focus is all about the theft of labor. Stealing the labor of folks is a sure fire way to get rich and it has been since, well, forever. Fighting efforts to protect people from the theft of their labor is what the modern so-called Conservative and/or Gliberterian movements are all about.

What made slavery so damn profitable was the theft of labor. It served two important purposes: 1) Free labor from your slaves, and 2) the labor you steal from your slaves helps to suppress the demand for higher wages from the labor of workers that you must pay.

Slavery offered an elite class multiple ways to cut cost and steal labor. This system of labor theft has experienced two great threats in the last 150 years. The first was the Civil War, which ended the above ground buying and selling of humans and the theft of their labor. This was a major victory in the long fight for justice, but it was not long before gains were pushed backed.

Good Afternoon.

As you go through the rest of your day, don’t forget JJP.

Drop those links. Engage in debate. Give us trivia and gossip too.

And continue to have a peaceful day.

id=”more-30776″>

There were basically three ways that labor was stolen for private profit and corporate gain. Convicts could be supplied with materials and forced to do piece work for a private person/company by the State. Or the State could sign a contract with this or that person and/or corporation to have this or that convict work to complete this or that task—sometimes reporting back to the State prison and sometimes becoming the “property” of the contract holder (Smithonia Y’all). Worst of all were the arrangements to just lease (sell) convicts to private persons/corporations to do with that prisoner as they saw fit for the duration of their leases. This was no different than slavery and the most common way to get out of a lease was to die.

In 1900, a Congressionally required report was issued by the Commission on Prison Labor. It showed the rise and spread of these new systems of slavery:

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/prison-labor/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30781″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/prison-labor.jpg” alt=”” title=”prison labor” width=”500″ height=”365″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30781″ />

This system of boldly stealing the labor of convicts lasted into the 1930s (and versions of it still can be found in almost every State of the Union). It was FDR and the new Democrats of the New Deal who passed a series of laws that made the theft of labor more difficult and help workers to organize and collectively bargain for a fair and living wage. It work. A great middle class in America was created and for almost fifty years prosperity was shared.

The effort to push back against labor rights started almost immediately. By 1947 this movement was able to pass the Taft Hartley Act and open the door to new restrictions to the rights of workers. By the Reagan era in the 1980s, the movement to steal labor was repackaged and resold to the most gullible and cynical among us. Since then it has picked up a lot of steam. Laws to restrict the rights of workers have been given the very Orwellian name, “Right to Work” laws—as in in you have the right to work, but not the right to come together and ask for a fair deal. In a “Right to Work” State, a worker is on his or her own. The State will always fight against you. You are on your own sucker and you just have to deal with it. In a “Right to Unionize State” you have back-up, regardless of whether or not you work in a Union shop.

Below is a map of Right to Work States (in red) and Right to Unionize States (in blue).

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/fighting-for-labor/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30782″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/fighting-for-labor.jpg” alt=”” title=”fighting for labor” width=”500″ height=”365″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30782″ />

When all the States turn from Blue to Red, then the Middle Class in America will be gone. It will be over. The Government will be organized to promote and support the theft of Labor by the elites just as the government of the Confederate States of America was organized.

Jack & Jill Politics


21
Feb 11

Afternoon Open Thread

under THEY ARE WHO WE THOUGHT THEY WERE:

href=”http://www.balloon-juice.com/2011/02/20/maps-to-consider/#comment-2439430″>Balloon Juice has done a couple of excellent posts about the happenings in Wisconsin. /> Follow the maps:

A few days ago, Josh Marshall over at TPM published a map of how various States treat collective bargaining for public employees’ unions:

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/collective-bargaining-by-state/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30779″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/collective-bargaining-by-state.jpg” alt=”” title=”collective bargaining by state” width=”500″ height=”393″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30779″ />

Deeper pattens emerge when you look at a map of Free States and Slave States as of 1857 when the Dred Scott Decision opened all US Territories (and all Free States) to Slavery:

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/dred-scott/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30780″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/dred-scott.jpg” alt=”” title=”dred scott” width=”500″ height=”385″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30780″ />

What thing becomes clear—as you consider the modern Republican Confederate Party’s effort to attack workers, Unions, the Middle Class and their rights—is that their focus is all about the theft of labor. Stealing the labor of folks is a sure fire way to get rich and it has been since, well, forever. Fighting efforts to protect people from the theft of their labor is what the modern so-called Conservative and/or Gliberterian movements are all about.

What made slavery so damn profitable was the theft of labor. It served two important purposes: 1) Free labor from your slaves, and 2) the labor you steal from your slaves helps to suppress the demand for higher wages from the labor of workers that you must pay.

Slavery offered an elite class multiple ways to cut cost and steal labor. This system of labor theft has experienced two great threats in the last 150 years. The first was the Civil War, which ended the above ground buying and selling of humans and the theft of their labor. This was a major victory in the long fight for justice, but it was not long before gains were pushed backed.

Good Afternoon.

As you go through the rest of your day, don’t forget JJP.

Drop those links. Engage in debate. Give us trivia and gossip too.

And continue to have a peaceful day.

id=”more-30776″>

There were basically three ways that labor was stolen for private profit and corporate gain. Convicts could be supplied with materials and forced to do piece work for a private person/company by the State. Or the State could sign a contract with this or that person and/or corporation to have this or that convict work to complete this or that task—sometimes reporting back to the State prison and sometimes becoming the “property” of the contract holder (Smithonia Y’all). Worst of all were the arrangements to just lease (sell) convicts to private persons/corporations to do with that prisoner as they saw fit for the duration of their leases. This was no different than slavery and the most common way to get out of a lease was to die.

In 1900, a Congressionally required report was issued by the Commission on Prison Labor. It showed the rise and spread of these new systems of slavery:

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/prison-labor/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30781″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/prison-labor.jpg” alt=”” title=”prison labor” width=”500″ height=”365″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30781″ />

This system of boldly stealing the labor of convicts lasted into the 1930s (and versions of it still can be found in almost every State of the Union). It was FDR and the new Democrats of the New Deal who passed a series of laws that made the theft of labor more difficult and help workers to organize and collectively bargain for a fair and living wage. It work. A great middle class in America was created and for almost fifty years prosperity was shared.

The effort to push back against labor rights started almost immediately. By 1947 this movement was able to pass the Taft Hartley Act and open the door to new restrictions to the rights of workers. By the Reagan era in the 1980s, the movement to steal labor was repackaged and resold to the most gullible and cynical among us. Since then it has picked up a lot of steam. Laws to restrict the rights of workers have been given the very Orwellian name, “Right to Work” laws—as in in you have the right to work, but not the right to come together and ask for a fair deal. In a “Right to Work” State, a worker is on his or her own. The State will always fight against you. You are on your own sucker and you just have to deal with it. In a “Right to Unionize State” you have back-up, regardless of whether or not you work in a Union shop.

Below is a map of Right to Work States (in red) and Right to Unionize States (in blue).

href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/afternoon-open-thread-530/fighting-for-labor/” rel=”attachment wp-att-30782″> src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/fighting-for-labor.jpg” alt=”” title=”fighting for labor” width=”500″ height=”365″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30782″ />

When all the States turn from Blue to Red, then the Middle Class in America will be gone. It will be over. The Government will be organized to promote and support the theft of Labor by the elites just as the government of the Confederate States of America was organized.


Jack & Jill Politics


21
Feb 11

Happy Presidents’ Day: Comment registration is open

Happy Presidents’ Day, readers.

For a limited time only, by popular demand, comment registration is open.

Click here to sign up.

Acquaint yourselves with the terms of use.

E-mail me at [email protected] if you have any problems. Put “COMMENT REGISTRATION” in the subject line.

And welcome to the fold!

Michelle Malkin


21
Feb 11

Open Thread: ‘It’s About Time Somebody Stood Up and Told the Truth’

That's Gov. Scott Walker's take on his role in Madison, Wisconsin, where he and Republican legislators have run into vociferous opposition to a plan to trim the rights of public sector unions.

The Heritage Foundation sat down for a brief interview with the governor. Check out the video below the break.


Thoughts on this video, or on the situation in Madison generally?

NewsBusters.org – Exposing Liberal Media Bias


21
Feb 11

Open Thread

CBSNewsRoom.jpg

Compliments of iOwnTheWorld.

Moonbattery


21
Feb 11

Monday Open Thread: Manifesto Edition

Today, in 1848, Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels published the Communist Manifesto. In other news, unions goons today in Wisconsin continue to tilt against windmills. More than 150 years later, the left is just as unrealistic. Yeah, that’s fitting.


Big Government


21
Feb 11

Monday Open Thread

Today is President’s Day, so we can celebrate it, and Black History Month at the same time. /> rel=”attachment wp-att-30772″ href=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/2011/02/monday-open-thread-135/presidents-of-the-united-states-3/”> class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-30772″ title=”presidents of the united states-3″ src=”http://www.jackandjillpolitics.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/presidents-of-the-united-states-3.jpg” alt=”” width=”535″ height=”410″ />

Good Morning.

As you begin a new week, don’t forget JJP.

Drop those links. Engage in debate.

Give us trivia and gossip too.

And always, have a peaceful day.

Jack & Jill Politics


20
Feb 11

FA Cup Sunday, Open Thread: 4th Round Replay and 5th Round Action


brisbane road FA Cup Sunday, Open Thread: 4th Round Replay and 5th Round Action

Photo by Tim Bertuchi

Sunday features four different matches involving Premier League clubs. The first is the Black Country derby between West Bromwich Albion, with Roy Hodgson in charge of his first match for the Baggies, against Wolverhampton Wanderers. The next match on deck is the Fourth Round FA Cup replay between Manchester City and Notts County at Eastlands. Then we have the FA Cup match between Fulham and Bolton, followed by Leyton Orient versus Arsenal.

Depending on who you support or what type of football match you prefer, there should be plenty to enjoy out of those four. I have a feeling that City will cruise at home against Notts County, so I’m not expecting much of a contest there. The derby between West Brom and Wolves should be very tense, so that may end up being the most riveting match of the day. Although don’t expect a tirade of goals there. Fulham against Bolton could be a close encounter, while Orient against Arsenal will be interesting to see how the Gunners perform at a lower league team after beating the best team in the world, Barcelona, earlier this week.

As always, post your questions, rants or observations about the matches either before, after or during the games on Sunday, in the comments section below.

Related posts:

  1. FA Cup Saturday, Open Thread: 4th Round Replays and 5th Round Action
  2. FA Cup Sunday, 4th Round: Open Thread
  3. Premier League Sunday, Gameweek 14: Open Thread



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