Posts Tagged: Killed


20
Dec 10

Jordanian al Qaeda operative killed in Afghanistan

An al Qaeda operative who was an administrator of an online jihadist forum was killed by US forces in Afghanistan.

Haythem bin Mohammed al Khayat, a Jordanian who was better known as Abu Kandahar al Zarqawi, was an administrator at the jihadist Al Hesbah forum and an associate of Abu Dujanah al Khurasani, the suicide bomber who carried out the suicide attack against the CIA at Combat Outpost Chapman in Khost province on Dec. 30, 2009, according to Flashpoint Partners, a consulting firm that monitors jihadist media. Khurasani’s suicide attack killed seven CIA operatives and a Jordanian intelligence officer.

Khurasani announced “the good news about the arrival here [in Afghanistan] of your brother Abu Kandahar” in a statement released on jihadist forums in September 2009, Flashpoint Partners reported. In an interview with the Global Islamic Media Front in April 2010, Abu Kandahar “urged residents of the Levant to ‘focus on the wars of assassinations, snipers and explosives.’”

Abu Kandahar was a member of an al Qaeda network that included Khurasani, a Jordanian and a longtime internet jihadi who had enticed the CIA with promises of being able to produce Ayman al Zawahiri, al Qaeda’s second in command. Khurasani was recruited by Jordanian intelligence to inform on al Qaeda’s leadership circles, but instead plotted to kill CIA agents in Afghanistan.

Other members of the network include Abu Abdulrahman al Qahtani, a veteran jihadist from Yemen; Ghazwan al Yemeni, a top operative in al Qaeda’s external operations network who aided in the attack at Combat Outpost Chapman; and Abu Dujanah al Sanaani, a Yemeni and an Internet jihadist who is known to have operated the Al Balagh Media Center and interviewed Siraj Haqqani. Qahtani, Ghazwan, and Sanaani also have been killed over the past several months during fighting and Predator strikes along the Afghan-Pakistani border.

“This network includes skilled bombmakers, ‘martyrdom” operatives, and senior commanders tightly ensconced with al Qaeda’s top leadership in the rugged terrain surrounding the Pakistan-Afghanistan border,” Flashpoint Partners reported on Dec. 12. With the death of Abu Kandahar, 10 of the 14 members of this network have been killed.

Targeting al Qaeda in Afghanistan

The US military routinely targets and kills al Qaeda commanders and operatives in Afghanistan. Al Qaeda often releases propaganda statements announcing their deaths. In late October, al Qaeda announced the death of five veteran jihadist commanders. Last week, a jihadist forum announced the death of Mahmud Abu Rideh, a Palestinian who was detained in the United Kingdom for four years.

In later October, the International Security Assistance force announced the death of two foreign al Qaeda operatives: a senior al Qaeda leader from Saudi Arabia named Abdallah Umar al Qurayshi and an explosives expert named Abu Atta al Kuwaiti. Both were killed in a US airstrike in Kunar province. Several “Arabic foreign fighters” were also said to have been killed in the same strike. Sa’ad Mohammad al Shahri, a longtime jihadist and the son of a retired Saudi colonel, is thought to have been among them. Scores of al Qaeda operatives have been killed in US military operations in Afghanistan since the beginning of 2010.

Al Qaeda’s extensive reach in Afghanistan is documented not only by al Qaeda’s propaganda statements, but in the body of press releases issued in recent years by the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. Looking at press releases dating back to March 2007, The Long War Journal has been able to detect the presence of al Qaeda and affiliated groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Islamic Jihad Union in 62 different districts in 19 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces.

This picture of an extensive al Qaeda presence in Afghanistan contradicts statements made by top Obama administration intelligence officials, including CIA Director Leon Panetta and National Counterterrorism Center Director Michael Leiter. Last spring, Panetta and Leiter claimed that only 50 to 100 al Qaeda operatives are active in Afghanistan. Administration officials have since ceased making such claims.

1 The Long War Journal


20
Dec 10

Jordanian al Qaeda operative killed in Afghanistan

An al Qaeda operative who was an administrator of an online jihadist forum was killed by US forces in Afghanistan.

Haythem bin Mohammed al Khayat, a Jordanian who was better known as Abu Kandahar al Zarqawi, was an administrator at the jihadist Al Hesbah forum and an associate of Abu Dujanah al Khurasani, the suicide bomber who carried out the suicide attack against the CIA at Combat Outpost Chapman in Khost province on Dec. 30, 2009, according to Flashpoint Partners, a consulting firm that monitors jihadist media. Khurasani’s suicide attack killed seven CIA operatives and a Jordanian intelligence officer.

Khurasani announced “the good news about the arrival here [in Afghanistan] of your brother Abu Kandahar” in a statement released on jihadist forums in September 2009, Flashpoint Partners reported. In an interview with the Global Islamic Media Front in April 2010, Abu Kandahar “urged residents of the Levant to ‘focus on the wars of assassinations, snipers and explosives.’”

Abu Kandahar was a member of an al Qaeda network that included Khurasani, a Jordanian and a longtime internet jihadi who had enticed the CIA with promises of being able to produce Ayman al Zawahiri, al Qaeda’s second in command. Khurasani was recruited by Jordanian intelligence to inform on al Qaeda’s leadership circles, but instead plotted to kill CIA agents in Afghanistan.

Other members of the network include Abu Abdulrahman al Qahtani, a veteran jihadist from Yemen; Ghazwan al Yemeni, a top operative in al Qaeda’s external operations network who aided in the attack at Combat Outpost Chapman; and Abu Dujanah al Sanaani, a Yemeni and an Internet jihadist who is known to have operated the Al Balagh Media Center and interviewed Siraj Haqqani. Qahtani, Ghazwan, and Sanaani also have been killed over the past several months during fighting and Predator strikes along the Afghan-Pakistani border.

“This network includes skilled bombmakers, ‘martyrdom” operatives, and senior commanders tightly ensconced with al Qaeda’s top leadership in the rugged terrain surrounding the Pakistan-Afghanistan border,” Flashpoint Partners reported on Dec. 12. With the death of Abu Kandahar, 10 of the 14 members of this network have been killed.

Targeting al Qaeda in Afghanistan

The US military routinely targets and kills al Qaeda commanders and operatives in Afghanistan. Al Qaeda often releases propaganda statements announcing their deaths. In late October, al Qaeda announced the death of five veteran jihadist commanders. Last week, a jihadist forum announced the death of Mahmud Abu Rideh, a Palestinian who was detained in the United Kingdom for four years.

In later October, the International Security Assistance force announced the death of two foreign al Qaeda operatives: a senior al Qaeda leader from Saudi Arabia named Abdallah Umar al Qurayshi and an explosives expert named Abu Atta al Kuwaiti. Both were killed in a US airstrike in Kunar province. Several “Arabic foreign fighters” were also said to have been killed in the same strike. Sa’ad Mohammad al Shahri, a longtime jihadist and the son of a retired Saudi colonel, is thought to have been among them. Scores of al Qaeda operatives have been killed in US military operations in Afghanistan since the beginning of 2010.

Al Qaeda’s extensive reach in Afghanistan is documented not only by al Qaeda’s propaganda statements, but in the body of press releases issued in recent years by the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. Looking at press releases dating back to March 2007, The Long War Journal has been able to detect the presence of al Qaeda and affiliated groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Islamic Jihad Union in 62 different districts in 19 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces.

This picture of an extensive al Qaeda presence in Afghanistan contradicts statements made by top Obama administration intelligence officials, including CIA Director Leon Panetta and National Counterterrorism Center Director Michael Leiter. Last spring, Panetta and Leiter claimed that only 50 to 100 al Qaeda operatives are active in Afghanistan. Administration officials have since ceased making such claims.

1 The Long War Journal


20
Dec 10

Jordanian al Qaeda operative killed in Afghanistan

An al Qaeda operative who was an administrator of an online jihadist forum was killed by US forces in Afghanistan.

Haythem bin Mohammed al Khayat, a Jordanian who was better known as Abu Kandahar al Zarqawi, was an administrator at the jihadist Al Hesbah forum and an associate of Abu Dujanah al Khurasani, the suicide bomber who carried out the suicide attack against the CIA at Combat Outpost Chapman in Khost province on Dec. 30, 2009, according to Flashpoint Partners, a consulting firm that monitors jihadist media. Khurasani’s suicide attack killed seven CIA operatives and a Jordanian intelligence officer.

Khurasani announced “the good news about the arrival here [in Afghanistan] of your brother Abu Kandahar” in a statement released on jihadist forums in September 2009, Flashpoint Partners reported. In an interview with the Global Islamic Media Front in April 2010, Abu Kandahar “urged residents of the Levant to ‘focus on the wars of assassinations, snipers and explosives.’”

Abu Kandahar was a member of an al Qaeda network that included Khurasani, a Jordanian and a longtime internet jihadi who had enticed the CIA with promises of being able to produce Ayman al Zawahiri, al Qaeda’s second in command. Khurasani was recruited by Jordanian intelligence to inform on al Qaeda’s leadership circles, but instead plotted to kill CIA agents in Afghanistan.

Other members of the network include Abu Abdulrahman al Qahtani, a veteran jihadist from Yemen; Ghazwan al Yemeni, a top operative in al Qaeda’s external operations network who aided in the attack at Combat Outpost Chapman; and Abu Dujanah al Sanaani, a Yemeni and an Internet jihadist who is known to have operated the Al Balagh Media Center and interviewed Siraj Haqqani. Qahtani, Ghazwan, and Sanaani also have been killed over the past several months during fighting and Predator strikes along the Afghan-Pakistani border.

“This network includes skilled bombmakers, ‘martyrdom” operatives, and senior commanders tightly ensconced with al Qaeda’s top leadership in the rugged terrain surrounding the Pakistan-Afghanistan border,” Flashpoint Partners reported on Dec. 12. With the death of Abu Kandahar, 10 of the 14 members of this network have been killed.

Targeting al Qaeda in Afghanistan

The US military routinely targets and kills al Qaeda commanders and operatives in Afghanistan. Al Qaeda often releases propaganda statements announcing their deaths. In late October, al Qaeda announced the death of five veteran jihadist commanders. Last week, a jihadist forum announced the death of Mahmud Abu Rideh, a Palestinian who was detained in the United Kingdom for four years.

In later October, the International Security Assistance force announced the death of two foreign al Qaeda operatives: a senior al Qaeda leader from Saudi Arabia named Abdallah Umar al Qurayshi and an explosives expert named Abu Atta al Kuwaiti. Both were killed in a US airstrike in Kunar province. Several “Arabic foreign fighters” were also said to have been killed in the same strike. Sa’ad Mohammad al Shahri, a longtime jihadist and the son of a retired Saudi colonel, is thought to have been among them. Scores of al Qaeda operatives have been killed in US military operations in Afghanistan since the beginning of 2010.

Al Qaeda’s extensive reach in Afghanistan is documented not only by al Qaeda’s propaganda statements, but in the body of press releases issued in recent years by the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. Looking at press releases dating back to March 2007, The Long War Journal has been able to detect the presence of al Qaeda and affiliated groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Islamic Jihad Union in 62 different districts in 19 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces.

This picture of an extensive al Qaeda presence in Afghanistan contradicts statements made by top Obama administration intelligence officials, including CIA Director Leon Panetta and National Counterterrorism Center Director Michael Leiter. Last spring, Panetta and Leiter claimed that only 50 to 100 al Qaeda operatives are active in Afghanistan. Administration officials have since ceased making such claims.

1 The Long War Journal


20
Dec 10

The Two Words That Killed the Prevention of Child Marriage Bill

Health services.”

“There are also concerns that funding will be directed to NGOs that promote and perform abortion and efforts to combat child marriage could be usurped as a way to overturn pro-life laws,” the alert read.

And so the bill, which needed a two-thirds vote to pass under the suspended rules, failed. Even some congressmen who sponsored the bill voted no.

McCollum, along with human rights organizations and the State Department, believes that child marriage is a form of child abuse that includes sexual abuse, domestic violence and slavery.

The text of the bill does not mention abortion, contraception or family planning. Instead, it directs the president to make preventing child marriage a priority, especially in countries where more than 40 percent of girls under the age of 18 are married. The ways to do that, according to the bill: support educating communities on the dangers and health effects of child marriage, keep young girls in school, support female mentoring programs and make sure girls have access to health care services.

It’s the “health care services” provision that had Republicans riled, according to a spokesman for House Minority Leader John Boehner, whose name is on the whip alert and who voted no on the bill.

“The concern was that the reference to ‘health services’ in the bill — under the current Administration — would include abortion services,” the spokesman, Michael Steel, told TPM.

Well, you can understand that, right? I mean, it’s regrettable and certainly not ideal for a girl 9 or 10 or 11 years old to be sold into sexual slavery to a man old enough to be her grandfather, but then what if while he’s raping her she gets pregnant? The way these Democrats define “health services,” that could mean that girl could be getting an abortion, and that would be unthinkable. Of course, no one wants to see a 9-year-old girl’s body being torn apart by full-term pregnancy and childbirth, but surely that would be the lesser of two evils if the alternative was fetus-murder.


The Moderate Voice


20
Dec 10

Al Qaeda-linked Taliban leader reported killed in Khyber Predator strike

Ibn-Amin.JPG

Ibn Amin, from a wanted poster released by the Pakistani government in 2009.

A Taliban leader who commanded one of al Qaeda’s military units in northwestern Pakistan is reported to have been killed by US Predators in the Dec. 17 airstrike in the Khyber tribal agency.

Ibn Amin, the commander of the Tora Bora Brigade, one of six formations in al Qaeda’s Lashkar al Zil or Shadow Army, is said to have been killed along with 32 terrorists by the US in an unmanned Predator attack in Speen Drang in the Tirah Valley in Pakistan’s Khyber tribal agency. The US carried out three strikes in the Tirah Valley on Dec. 17, and another on Dec. 16.

Amin is said to have been meeting with leaders of the Lashkar-e-Islam, a Taliban-like group that controls large areas of Khyber. Eight Lashkar-e-Islam commanders were reported killed in the strike. Leaders of the Lashkar-e-Islam said Amin was among those killed in the strike.

Amin was attempting to repair a rift between top leaders of the Lashkar-e-Islam, which is commander by Mangal Bagh, Geo News reported.

One of the most wanted Taliban leaders in Pakistan, Amin was Mullah Fazlullah second in command; Falzlullah is the overall leader of the Swat Taliban.

In May, 2009, the government placed a 15 million rupee ($ 185,000) bounty out for Amin for leading the Swat Taliban’s military forces during the Taliban takeover from 2007 to 2009. He was known for his brutality; his forces routinely executed and butchered anyone who opposed Taliban rule in the Swat Valley, including policemen, soldiers, and government officials.

Amin is said to have been involved in the execution and beheading of Pir Saimullah, an anti-Taliban tribal leader, and desecration of his corpse in December 2009. The Taliban dug up Pir Saimullah’s corpse, hanged it upside down, and warned villagers not to bury the body let they incur the Taliban’s wrath.

As the leader of the Tora Bora Brigade, he is said to have commanded between 1,500 and 2,000 fighters. The Pakistani Army ejected the Taliban from Swat after the Taliban overreached and invaded neighboring districts. The Taliban takeover of Buner in April 2009, which was organized by Amin, put the Taliban withing 60 miles of Islamabad and sparked fears of the collapse of the Pakistani government.

Amin is reported to have been sheltering in the Mohmand tribal agency and reorganizing the Swat Taliban for an al Qaeda-led offensive in the northwest. According to the Asia Times, Amin’s fighters were training in the Tirah Valley in Khyber.

Amin has been reported killed in the past. The Pakistani military and the interior ministry claimed Amin was killed in May 2009 during the Swat offensive. Amin later resurfaced and took control of the Taliban forces in Swat, and continued to carry out harassment attacks against the military.

1 The Long War Journal


19
Dec 10

If Justin Beiber Killed Bulls

Laurence Lowe profiles Michelito Lagravere, the 12 year-old Mexican bullfighter:

Ask him if he remembers his first kill and he says, "It was October 27, 2005, in my mother's home state of Tabasco. I was 6 years old." Four years later he tried to set a Guinness World Record for novice bullfighters (novilleros) by slaying six bulls in a single appearance—and succeeded, but Guinness refused to recognize it. ("We do not accept records based on the killing or harming of animals," its website explained.)

This past June, Michelito became the youngest matador ever to perform in the world's largest bullfighting arena; he was such a hit that he was invited back in August. That time, Michelito got knocked to the ground by a big black bull by the name of Manguero—coming dangerously close to catching its horn; but he managed to pick himself up, then to thrust his sword between the bull's shoulder blades. Manguero knelt in the sand and took his last breath, and as Michelito stood over his kill, his face smeared with blood, the crowd at Plaza Mexico went berserk.





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The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan


19
Dec 10

Senate beats back amendment that would have killed START treaty

GOP skeptical of Obama’s commitment to missile defense.
American Thinker Blog


17
Dec 10

Transparency Killed The Earmarking Stars?

Vindication.
Hot Air » Top Picks


16
Dec 10

British-born jihadists killed in strike on al-Qaeda in Pakistan

The “al-Qaeda pipeline” hits a snag, but no thanks, as usual, to our Friend and Ally who is unwilling to assert sovereignty over its own territory. “Two Brit Muslim converts killed in drone attacks in Pakistan,” from Asia News International, December 16 (thanks to Twostellas): London, Dec 16 : Two…
Jihad Watch


16
Dec 10

Gaza terrorist killed – by the US

From Ma’an:

A Palestinian family in Gaza has received news that their son, Mahmoud Abu Rideh, died a few days ago in a US bombing in Afghanistan.

The man’s family, from Bani Sheila – a town east of Khan Younis – heard from friend’s of their son that Mahmoud was with a group of ‘mujahideen’ before the airstrike.

Another Gazan, just minding his own business while hanging with his jihadist friends.



Elder of Ziyon


16
Dec 10

British al Qaeda Killed in Pakistan

One has to love the Telegraph headline “Drone kills white al-Qaeda pair in Pakistan mountains.”
Outside the Beltway


15
Dec 10

Palestinian al Qaeda operative reported killed in Afghanistan

Abu-Rideh.jpg

Mahmud Abu Rideh.

A Palestinian member of al Qaeda who was jailed in the United Kingdom after the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States is reported to have been killed in a US airstrike in Afghanistan. The report has not been confirmed.

Mahmud Abu Rideh, a Palestinian from Khan Younis, is reported to killed by the US military in a recent airstrike in Afghanistan, according to Flashpoint Intel, a consulting company that tracks jihadist propaganda and terrorists networks.

US military and intelligence officials contacted by The Long War Journal would neither confirm nor deny the reports of Abu Rideh’s death. It is not clear if Abu Rideh has even left Britain.

Abu Rideh arrived in Britain with his family in 1995 and was granted assylum in 1998. He was detained along with several suspected jihadists by the British government for having links to al Qaeda in December 2001. David Blunkett, Britain’s Home Secretary accused Rideh of being “an active supporter of various terrorist groups, including those with links to Osama bin Ladin’s terrorist network”.

British authorities detained Abu for four years at the Belmarsh prison as the government attempted to deport him to Jordan, where he was born. At one point he was transferred to “Broadmoor hospital near London, a top security unit which houses some of Britain’s most dangerous mentally ill criminals,” Al Jazeera reported in January 2005.

Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International took up Abu Rideh’s case and sought to block his deportation to Jordan due to fears he would be tortured by Jordan’s General Intelligence Department.

In 2004, Britain’s highest court ruled that the emergency laws that allowed the government to hold Abu Rideh violated his human rights, and ordered his release. In March 2005, Abu Rideh was released from prison but was subject to a “control order,” a form of house arrest which restricted his movements and allowed him to be monitored.

In July 2009, Abu Rideh, with the help of Amnesty International, succeeded in having the control order lifted. Amnesty International then sought to have his overseas travel restrictions lifted.

Abu Rideh granted an interview with Iran’s PressTV in August 2009. In the interview, Abu Rideh repeatedly claimed he was abused and tortured by British police and intelligence officials. He also denied having any links to al Qaeda.

The US military routinely targets and kills al Qaeda commanders and operatives in Afghanistan. AlQ aeda often releases propaganda statements announcing their deaths. In late October, al Qaeda announced the death of five veteran jihadi commanders.

Al Qaeda’s extensive reach in Afghanistan is documented not only by al Qaeda’s propaganda statements, but in the body of press releases issued in recent years by the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. Looking at press releases dating back to March 2007, The Long War Journal has been able to detect the presence of al Qaeda and affiliated groups such as the Islamic Jihad Union in 62 different districts in 19 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces.

This picture of an extensive al Qaeda presence in Afghanistan contradicts statements made by top Obama administration intelligence officials, including CIA Director Leon Panetta and National Counterterrorism Center Director Michael Leiter. Last spring, Panetta and Leiter claimed that only 50 to 100 al Qaeda operatives are active in Afghanistan. Administration officials have since ceased making such claims.

1 The Long War Journal


15
Dec 10

A dream denied: Border Patrol agent Brian Terry killed in Arizona

More horrible news from the southern border. One of the officers who put his life on the line to protect our security and sovereignty has been shot and killed.

Four suspects are in custody.

USA Today reports:

A Border Patrol agent was shot and killed Tuesday night near Rio Rico after encountering several suspects, federal authorities said Wednesday.

Agent Brian Terry was killed just 10 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border, north of Nogales. Four suspects are in custody and one is being pursued, according to a press release from Customs and Border Protection.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office are investigating.

Meanwhile, Senate Democrats continue to push the pro-amnesty DREAM Act and security-undermining environmental land grabs.

Priorities…

Michelle Malkin


12
Dec 10

Daily Commentary – Thursday, December 9th, 2010 – Ronni Chasen Murder Linked to Subsequent SuicideThe police linked the gun that killed Ronni Chasen to a weapon used in the suicide of an ex-con, and believe her murder was a robbery gone wrong.

  • The police linked the gun that killed Ronni Chasen to a weapon used in the suicide of an ex-con, and believe her murder was a robbery gone wrong.
Daily Commentary – Thursday, December 9th, 2010 – Ronni Chasen Murder Linked to Subsequent Suicide [1:52m]:  | Download

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Scared Monkeys


11
Dec 10

Yemeni al Qaeda operative killed along Afghan-Pakistani border

A seasoned al Qaeda operative from Yemen was among several terrorists killed in a US raid along the Afghan-Pakistani border last month.

The al Qaeda operative was identified as Abu Abdulrahman al Qahtani, a veteran jihadist from Yemen, according to a martyrdom statement released on the Al Faloja Forum, a website frequented by al Qaeda supporters. He was killed along with “a number of brothers” in “the land of Khorasan” on “on the night of the Eid,” or Nov. 16. The Khorasan is a region that encompasses large areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Iran.

The statement announcing Qahtani’s death was released in Arabic and translated by Flashpoint Partners, a website that monitors jihadist media. The statement was not released through an official al Qaeda outlet but is “very credible,” Flashpoint Partner’s Evan Kohlmann told The Long War Journal.

“Al Qahtani was an active user on the Faloja forum,” Kohlamnn said. “He used to post updates from the frontlines about Arab mujahideen fighters in AFPAK [the Afghanistan-Pakistan region].”

Qahtani was 45 years old when he was killed. He was a veteran of the wars in Afghanistan, and fought for “decades” on “the fields of jihad.” Qahtani fought against the Soviet Union in the 1980s, and returned to battle the Americans after the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001.

Qahtani was a close associate of al Qaeda operatives Ghazwan al Yemeni, Abu Dujanah al Sanaani, and Abu Dujanah al Khurasani.

Abu Dujanah al Khurasani, who is also known as Humam Khalil Muhammed Abu Mulal al Balawi, carried out the suicide attack against the CIA at Combat Outpost Chapman in Khost province on Dec. 30, 2009 that killed seven CIA operatives and a Jordanian intelligence officer. Khurasani, a Jordanian, had enticed the CIA with promises of being able to produce Ayman al Zawahiri, al Qaeda’s second in command. Khurasani, like Qahtani, was a longtime internet jihadi.

Ghazwan al Yemeni, who is also known as Sadam Hussein Al Hussami, was a top operative in al Qaeda’s external operations network. He aided in the suicide attack on Combat Outpost Chapman, which killed seven CIA officials and a Jordanian intelligence officer. Ghazwan was killed in a US Predator strike in North Waziristan, Pakistan, on March 8.

Abu Dujanah al Sanaani, also a Yemeni and an Internet jihadist, is known to have operated the Al Balagh Media Center, a terrorist propaganda outlet. In March 2010, Sanaani conducted an interview with Siraj Haqqani, the leader of the al Qaeda-linked Haqqani Network who operates on both sides of the Afghan-Pakistani border. Sanaani had not previously been reported killed, but the statement indicated Qahtani has joined Saanani, Ghazwan, and Khurasani “in the afterlife.”

Al Qaeda often announces the death of its senior and mid-level leaders. In late October, in a statement released on the Internet, al Qaeda announced the death of five veteran operatives.

The US has been targeting al Qaeda on both sides of the Afghan-Pakistani border. In Pakistan, the Predator campaign has killed scores of top level al Qaeda leaders and military and terrorist commanders since the campaign began in 2004.

1 The Long War Journal


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