Currently viewing the tag: “Wisconsin”

**Written by Doug Powers

Will the hard left sentence her to three months at HW & Bubba’s Institute for Civil Discourse for extensive “new civility” re-education, or have a parade in her honor? That was just a rhetorical question, by the way.

From the Journal-Sentinel:

Madison — A 26-year-old woman was charged Thursday with two felony counts and two misdemeanor counts accusing her of making email threats against Wisconsin lawmakers during the height of the battle over Gov. Scott Walker’s budget-repair bill.

Katherine R. Windels of Cross Plains was named in a criminal complaint filed in Dane County Circuit Court.

According to the criminal complaint, Windels sent an email threat to state Sen. Robert Cowles (R-Green Bay) on March 9, the day the Senate passed a measure to sharply curtail collective bargaining for public workers. Later that evening, she sent another email to 15 Republican legislators, including Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau), the complaint says.

The subject of the second email was: “Atten.: Death Threat!!!! Bomb!!!” In that email, she purportedly wrote, “Please put your things in order because you will be killed and your families will also be killed due to your actions in the last 8 weeks.”

“I hope you have a good time in hell,” she allegedly wrote in the lengthy email that listed scenarios in which the legislators and their families would die, including bombings and by “putting a nice little bullet in your head.”

According to the complaint, Windels told investigators, “I sent out emails that I was disgusted and very upset by what they were doing.” Asked if she intended to follow through, Windels said, “No,” according to the complaint.

CNN:

According to the complaint, investigators read Windels excerpts from the e-mails, and she replied, “I know I said that, but I don’t know why I said that.”

Windels allegedly told police that she did not intend to follow through on any of her statements.

Underground Conservative:

She is a 2010 graduate of Madison Area Technical College with an Associate’s Degree in Early Childhood Education

Which leads Ed Morrissey to this:

More importantly, the parents of children at the school might want to know that someone unstable (and stupid) enough to send terrorist death threats to politicians from her home computer is being entrusted with the students.

Here’s a big surprise — it looks like the Democrat D.A. had been dragging his heels in pursuing the matter. I’m only guessing that if this had been a Tea Party member she’d have been in custody by last weekend, but not in this case:

Windels is not in custody. The D.A.’s office says she won’t be arrested.

Big Government posted a letter from the Wisconsin Department of Justice concerning the amount of time the situation had been gathering dust on the D.A.’s desk. Here’s part of it (“DCI” is the Department of Criminal Investigation):

Investigators concluded it did not present an imminent threat but presented sufficient probable cause that criminal behavior had occurred and on Friday, March 18, 2011 this matter was referred to the Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne who has sole jurisdiction and charging authority for a charging decision.

On Monday, March 23, 2011 the Department of Justice learned through press reports that the Dane County District Attorney had returned the referral to the Department citing clerical and administrative issues related to the reports transfer. Importantly the investigative reports themselves were not returned. It is important to note that this Department routinely refers investigative reports to District Attorneys, including the Dane County District Attorney, for their review and charging decisions.

This is where this matter currently sits.

We are concerned about the lack of action regarding this referral.

Concerned, maybe, but there’s no way they’re surprised.

As BG points out, yes, this is the same District Attorney who’s busy battling Republicans to stall implementation of Wisconsin’s new government union collective bargaining law, so he’s obviously a little too preoccupied to pursue somebody who sent over a dozen little death threats.

(h/t Doug RossUnderground ConservativeGateway Pundit)

**Written by Doug Powers

Twitter @ThePowersThatBe

Michelle Malkin

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**Written by Doug Powers

Will the hard left sentence her to three months at HW & Bubba’s Institute for Civil Discourse for extensive “new civility” re-education, or have a parade in her honor? That was just a rhetorical question, by the way.

From the Journal-Sentinel:

Madison — A 26-year-old woman was charged Thursday with two felony counts and two misdemeanor counts accusing her of making email threats against Wisconsin lawmakers during the height of the battle over Gov. Scott Walker’s budget-repair bill.

Katherine R. Windels of Cross Plains was named in a criminal complaint filed in Dane County Circuit Court.

According to the criminal complaint, Windels sent an email threat to state Sen. Robert Cowles (R-Green Bay) on March 9, the day the Senate passed a measure to sharply curtail collective bargaining for public workers. Later that evening, she sent another email to 15 Republican legislators, including Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau), the complaint says.

The subject of the second email was: “Atten.: Death Threat!!!! Bomb!!!” In that email, she purportedly wrote, “Please put your things in order because you will be killed and your families will also be killed due to your actions in the last 8 weeks.”

“I hope you have a good time in hell,” she allegedly wrote in the lengthy email that listed scenarios in which the legislators and their families would die, including bombings and by “putting a nice little bullet in your head.”

According to the complaint, Windels told investigators, “I sent out emails that I was disgusted and very upset by what they were doing.” Asked if she intended to follow through, Windels said, “No,” according to the complaint.

CNN:

According to the complaint, investigators read Windels excerpts from the e-mails, and she replied, “I know I said that, but I don’t know why I said that.”

Windels allegedly told police that she did not intend to follow through on any of her statements.

Underground Conservative:

She is a 2010 graduate of Madison Area Technical College with an Associate’s Degree in Early Childhood Education

Which leads Ed Morrissey to this:

More importantly, the parents of children at the school might want to know that someone unstable (and stupid) enough to send terrorist death threats to politicians from her home computer is being entrusted with the students.

Here’s a big surprise — it looks like the Democrat D.A. had been dragging his heels in pursuing the matter. I’m only guessing that if this had been a Tea Party member she’d have been in custody by last weekend, but not in this case:

Windels is not in custody. The D.A.’s office says she won’t be arrested.

Big Government posted a letter from the Wisconsin Department of Justice concerning the amount of time the situation had been gathering dust on the D.A.’s desk. Here’s part of it (“DCI” is the Department of Criminal Investigation):

Investigators concluded it did not present an imminent threat but presented sufficient probable cause that criminal behavior had occurred and on Friday, March 18, 2011 this matter was referred to the Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne who has sole jurisdiction and charging authority for a charging decision.

On Monday, March 23, 2011 the Department of Justice learned through press reports that the Dane County District Attorney had returned the referral to the Department citing clerical and administrative issues related to the reports transfer. Importantly the investigative reports themselves were not returned. It is important to note that this Department routinely refers investigative reports to District Attorneys, including the Dane County District Attorney, for their review and charging decisions.

This is where this matter currently sits.

We are concerned about the lack of action regarding this referral.

Concerned, maybe, but there’s no way they’re surprised.

As BG points out, yes, this is the same District Attorney who’s busy battling Republicans to stall implementation of Wisconsin’s new government union collective bargaining law, so he’s obviously a little too preoccupied to pursue somebody who sent over a dozen little death threats.

(h/t Doug RossUnderground ConservativeGateway Pundit)

**Written by Doug Powers

Twitter @ThePowersThatBe

Michelle Malkin

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Democrats in Wisconsin are saying they now have enough signatures to trigger a recall election of state Sen. Dan Kapanke (R) and will file petitions Friday, the La Crosse Tribune reports.

The recall petition against Kapanke — who has been targeted because of his vote to pare down collective bargaining rights for public employees – would be the first filed against a Wisconsin legislator following the much-publicized collective bargaining dispute in the state.

Recall organizer Pat Scheller said volunteers have gathered more than the 15,588 signatures needed and that they plan to take them to Madison after a noon rally today at La Crosse City Hall, the Tribune reports.

Every Wisconsin state senator eligible for a recall this year (those who have been in office more than one year) is being targeted by recall efforts. Eight GOP state senators (including Kapanke) have been targeted, while eight Democratic senators are being targeted for having previously left the state to avoid a vote on the collective bargaining measure.

Kapanke has defended his vote for the collective bargaining measure and while he did not return messages from the Tribune Thursday, he has said the recall is “part of the process.”

The Tribune reports the next steps in the process following today’s filing will be a 31-day review period during which the signatures will be looked at to determine if they are sufficient. Kapanke can challenge signatures during the first 10 days and either party can petition a judge for an extension.

According to the state Government Accountability Board’s manual on recall elections, “if the filing officer finds that the petition is sufficient,” the filing officer will call a recall election — akin to a special election for an open seat.

The Tribune notes that once an election is ordered, challengers can begin circulating petitions to get their names on the ballot and would have 10 days to collect 400 signatures.

Meanwhile, The La Crosse County Republican Party is already preparing for a recall election to oust Kapanke, and county chair has said he thinks it’s a “foregone conclusion that they’re going to get the signatures that they need.”

Hotline On Call

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Wisconsin Democrats will file petitions today with enough signatures to trigger a recall election of state Sen. Dan Kapanke (R), one of eight Senate Republicans targeted over votes to curtail collective bargaining rights for public workers, the La Crosse Tribune reports.

“The filing comes just before the halfway point in the 60-day
window the recall committee had to gather signatures in
the district.”

Kapanke has said the recall is “part of the process,” adding “I love campaigns. I just didn’t think I’d do one every year.”
Taegan Goddard’s Political Wire

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Why did the state of Wisconsin bother to have an election last November?

To look at the results, you would think the voters had spoken clearly. They elected a Republican governor and legislature, based on the promise that they would take strong action to balance the state budget and give schools and municipalities more control over their local budgets.

Within a few weeks of taking office, the Republicans followed through on their promise.

Public sector unions that had stubbornly refused to make concessions to help struggling schools and municipalities save money were called out. Labor costs comprise about 80 percent of any school or municipal budget, but the unions wouldn’t let local officials cut labor costs.

The unions abused their collective bargaining privileges, so the state moved to take most of those privileges away. We elect state officials to make those kinds of decisions. If voters decide later that those decisions were wrong, they elect different people next time.

But it’s beginning to seem like the will of the people, as reflected in the election results, is completely irrelevant. The Democrats and their special interest sponsors in the labor movement are using any means at their disposal to block the efforts of the officials who won the election.

Our Founding Fathers warned against “the tyranny of the minority.” This must have been the type of situation they had in mind.

First we had the runaway Senate Democrats, who accept large cash donations from the unions to do their bidding. They fled to Illinois and blocked the legislative process, because the voters did not elect enough of them to defeat Gov. Scott Walker’s proposed legislation through prescribed methods.

How is that democracy?

Now we have Circuit Court Judge Maryann Sumi, a woman whose family is knee-deep in Democratic Party politics, blocking implementation of Walker’s legislation. She issued a temporary restraining order, based on the accusation that a Senate committee approved the law in violation of the open meetings act. When the Legislative Reference Bureau published the law anyway, she reiterated her order and threatened anyone who implemented the law with sanctions.

That poses a simple question – if the Senate committee indeed violated the open meetings law, couldn’t it just meet again, vote in favor of the law again, then have the full Senate pass it again and the governor sign it again?

Not so simple, according to a Senate staffer. The Senate could do all of that, but the Democrats have vowed to keep posing legal challenge after legal challenge, to block implementation of the bill indefinitely.

As one key Democrat told the media, his party will use a “tsunami of litigation” to hold up the process. And there’s no doubt that they can go judge shopping and find useful tools like Judge Sumi any time they want.

How is that democracy?

People love to gripe about the influence of special interests in government. Now they’re watching a horrific example of special interest influence blocking the will of the voters, and nobody is saying a word.

The Democrats who are doing the unions’ bidding accept thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from organized labor every year. That’s what special interests do – purchase the loyalty of lawmakers – sometimes Democrats, sometimes Republicans – to protect their agenda.

And the unions’ pet lawmakers will go to any length to disrupt the process, even if that defies the will of the voters.

It’s hard to believe that the average voters of Wisconsin, who cannot afford to purchase the loyalty of legislators, are not descending on Madison in droves, demanding that the people they elected to govern be allowed to govern.


Big Government

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After revising the original ruling for the third time, a Wisconsin Judge ruled that Governor Scott Walker’s law should

This time, the judge warned that any officials who violate it, will face sanctions.

 

Liberty Pundits Blog

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We just received this shocking email from the Wisconsin Department of Justice Spokesperson Bill Cosh.

The DCI to which he refers is the Department of Justice’s Department of Criminal Investigation.

Beginning on February 21, 2011  DCI was asked to investigate multiple threats to various members of the Wisconsin Legislature due to the volume, our ability to fully analyze the many communications and our experience. I believe it’s also fair to say authorities believed we would be prompt in our efforts to investigate and take appropriate action given the nature of the threats and the climate at the time.

DCI immediately reviewed and analyzed what was sent. Every referral was investigated. In the judgment of investigators, some presented a need for more intense investigation; some did not. One case in particular, which was started upon the receipt of threats on March 9, 2011, the subject of whom is a Dane County resident, was thoroughly investigated.

Investigators concluded it did not present an imminent threat but presented sufficient probable cause that criminal behavior had occurred and on Friday, March 18, 2011 this matter was referred to the Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne who has sole jurisdiction and charging authority for a charging decision.

On Monday, March 23, 2011 the Department of Justice learned through press reports that the Dane County District Attorney had returned the referral to the Department citing clerical and administrative issues related to the reports transfer.  Importantly the investigative reports themselves were not returned. It is important to note that this Department routinely refers investigative reports to District Attorneys, including the Dane County District Attorney, for their review and charging decisions.

This is where this matter currently sits.

We are concerned about the lack of action regarding this referral.

Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne isn’t twiddling this thumbs, however. In fact he has been quite busy lately.

He’s leading the charge to block the implementation of Wisconsin’s new labor law which limits the collective bargaining powers of Wisconsin government unions. The very same law which prompted the occupation of the Wisconsin State Capitol and the myriad of threats to Republican officials.


Big Government

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We just received this shocking email from the Wisconsin Department of Justice Spokesperson Bill Cosh.

The DCI to which he refers is the Department of Justice’s Department of Criminal Investigation.

Beginning on February 21, 2011  DCI was asked to investigate multiple threats to various members of the Wisconsin Legislature due to the volume, our ability to fully analyze the many communications and our experience. I believe it’s also fair to say authorities believed we would be prompt in our efforts to investigate and take appropriate action given the nature of the threats and the climate at the time.

DCI immediately reviewed and analyzed what was sent. Every referral was investigated. In the judgment of investigators, some presented a need for more intense investigation; some did not. One case in particular, which was started upon the receipt of threats on March 9, 2011, the subject of whom is a Dane County resident, was thoroughly investigated.

Investigators concluded it did not present an imminent threat but presented sufficient probable cause that criminal behavior had occurred and on Friday, March 18, 2011 this matter was referred to the Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne who has sole jurisdiction and charging authority for a charging decision.

On Monday, March 23, 2011 the Department of Justice learned through press reports that the Dane County District Attorney had returned the referral to the Department citing clerical and administrative issues related to the reports transfer.  Importantly the investigative reports themselves were not returned. It is important to note that this Department routinely refers investigative reports to District Attorneys, including the Dane County District Attorney, for their review and charging decisions.

This is where this matter currently sits.

We are concerned about the lack of action regarding this referral.

Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne isn’t twiddling this thumbs, however. In fact he has been quite busy lately.

He’s leading the charge to block the implementation of Wisconsin’s new labor law which limits the collective bargaining powers of Wisconsin government unions. The very same law which prompted the occupation of the Wisconsin State Capitol and the myriad of threats to Republican officials.


Big Government

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Wisconsin state judge Maryann Sumi has ruled that the state’s hotly contested collective bargaining law is not in effect and cannot be implemented:

Wisconsin’s new collective bargaining law has not been published and is not in effect, a judge has ordered.

Judge Maryann Sumi ordered Thursday morning that the law “has not been published within the meaning” of Wisconsin law and “is therefore not in effect.”

A spokesman for Gov. Scott Walker had no immediate comment, and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, could not be reached immediately for comment.

But Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald, R-Horicon, repeated his previous statements that the judge “wants to keep interjecting herself into the legislative process with no regard to the state constitution.”

A spokeswoman for the state Department of Administration could not be reached immediately for comment.

Something tells me this isn’t quite over yet.

 




Outside the Beltway

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Wisconsin state judge Maryann Sumi has ruled that the state’s hotly contested collective bargaining law is not in effect and cannot be implemented:

Wisconsin’s new collective bargaining law has not been published and is not in effect, a judge has ordered.

Judge Maryann Sumi ordered Thursday morning that the law “has not been published within the meaning” of Wisconsin law and “is therefore not in effect.”

A spokesman for Gov. Scott Walker had no immediate comment, and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, could not be reached immediately for comment.

But Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald, R-Horicon, repeated his previous statements that the judge “wants to keep interjecting herself into the legislative process with no regard to the state constitution.”

A spokeswoman for the state Department of Administration could not be reached immediately for comment.

Something tells me this isn’t quite over yet.

 




Outside the Beltway

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Nearly two weeks ago, Wisconsin state Judge Maryann Sumi issued a temporary restraining order (TRO) prohibiting Wisconsin’s Secretary of State from “publishing” Gov. Scott Walker’s (R) anti-union law. Because Wisconsin law requires the Secretary of State’s office to publish a law before the law may take effect, this TRO should have suspended the law for as long as Sumi’s order remains in effect. Nevertheless, the state’s Republican leadership asked a different government office to publish the law on its website, and the Walker Administration has already begun to implement the law in defiance of Sumi’s original order.

This morning, Judge Sumi issued a new order clarifying that any attempt to implement Walker’s assault on working families is lawless:

[I]t is hereby DECLARED that 2011 Wisconsin Act 10 has not been published…and is therefore not in effect.

In a third order, issued two days ago, Judge Sumi threatened sanctions against officials who act in defiance of her court orders. Under Wisconsin law, someone who intentionally defies a court order is in contempt of court, and can be fined up to $ 2,000 for each day that they disobey the court or imprisoned for up to six months.

One interesting twist in this entire debacle is that the sole basis of Sumi’s orders is a claim that Wisconsin Republicans violated the state’s open meetings law by passing the order without proper notice. Accordingly, Gov. Walker’s anti-union allies could eliminate this legal barrier simply by voting on the law again after providing the legally required notice. The fact that they have not yet done so suggests that they many no longer have the votes to ram Walker’s massively unpopular legislation through the legislature.

ThinkProgress

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You may have seen news that Wisconsin’s AFSCME public-sector union is threatening businesses with possible boycott if they refuse to voice support for the union position. Obviously, it’s pretty galling — and potentially illegal.

The Journal-Sentinel reported that AFSCME Council 24 has informed local business that they must put a sign in their window showing their public support for the union’s position or “Failure to do so will leave us no choice but (to) do a public boycott of your business. And sorry, neutral means ‘no’ to those who work for the largest employer in the area and are union members.”

Translation: That’s a nice business you got there. It would be a shame if something happened to it.

That sounds like a fairly explicit threat to harm a company’s business. So it’s worth noting these Wisconsin laws*:

943.30 Threats to injure or accuse of crime. (1) Whoever, either verbally or by any written or printed communication,
maliciously threatens to accuse or accuses another of any crime or offense, or threatens or commits any injury to the person, property, business, profession, calling or trade, or the profits and income of any business, profession, calling or trade of another, with intent thereby to extort money or any pecuniary advantage whatever, or with intent to compel the person so threatened to do any act against the person’s will or omit to do any lawful act, is guilty of a Class H felony.

943.31 Threats to communicate derogatory information. Whoever threatens to communicate to anyone information, whether true or false, which would injure the reputation of the threatened person or another unless the threatened person transfers property to a person known not to be entitled to it is guilty of a Class I felony.
History: 1977 c. 173; 2001 a. 109.
A threat to injure a manager’s reputation unless a job is offered violated this section.
State v. Gilkes, 118 Wis. 2d 149, 345 N.W.2d 531 (Ct. App. 1984).

And:

134.01 Injury to business; restraint of will. Any 2 or more persons who shall combine, associate, agree, mutually undertake or concert together for the purpose of willfully or maliciously injuring another in his or her reputation, trade, business or profession by any means whatever, or for the purpose of maliciously compelling another to do or perform any act against his or
her will, or preventing or hindering another from doing or performing any lawful act shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail not more than one year or by fine not exceeding $ 500.

* h/t to Halt The Assault spokesman Brett McMahon // photo credit: flickr/mrbula


Big Government

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There’s an election in Wisconsin on Tuesday that could end up deciding the fate of the state’s controversial collective bargaining law:

Scott Walker’s anti-union team could suffer a big defeat in Wisconsin’s April 5 Supreme Court election. If Dem-backed JoAnne Kloppenburg defeats Republican David Prosser, she could lead a 4-3 majority to overturn Walker’s anti-union law. (Kloppenburg has telegraphed as much, saying ”The events of the last few weeks have put into sharp relief how important the Supreme Court is as a check on overreach in the other branches of government.”) Worse, a Prosser loss will be played up in the national press as a voter repudiation of Walker and his agenda-a turning of the tide, second Tunisia, Spring Awakening, etc.  The left is already gloating over private polls that show the race close-not good news for an incumbent in a low-turnout election. … What’s more, it looks as if the left has the money advantage, in part because Prosser opted for public financing.

Wisconsin conservative talk radio host Charlie Sykes agrees:

I think it will be close: the left is engaged and enraged. We conservatives are engaged. Don’t know about the independents. This is a traditionally very low turnout election and if the unions turn out their troops, there might be enough votes to flip the court. But no one on our side is complacent about this. We understand that, as you say, it is for all the marbles.

This will turn on how the race is defined: if voters decide based on credentials: Prosser wins; if they see it as a choice between a liberal and a conservative judge, Prosser wins; if it turns on who is tough on crime, Prosser wins.

But, if it is seen as a referendum on Walker or the union bill, Kloppenburg has a very real shot.

This in a state where a sitting State Supreme Court Justice losing a re-election bid is nearly as rare as Halley’s Comet. This in a state that just 4 months ago (feels like years) voted overwhelmingly for Republican rule.

The left seems to have been paying more attention to this race than the right, and a defeat for Prosser her will undoubtedly energize them.




Outside the Beltway

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Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker and his Administration are setting themselves up for a showdown with the state’s judiciary with their decision to implement the provisions of the recently passed collective bargaining law despite the fact that a state trial court judge has ordered that it not be implemented:

State officials have not stopped putting in place changes to collective bargaining rules for public employees despite a judge’s order barring the law’s implementation — and a threat of sanctions against anyone who violates it.

Department of Administration Secretary Mike Huebsch said Wednesday he has a legal obligation to implement all laws passed by the Legislature, signed by Gov. Scott Walker and published into law. Huebsch said the Department of Justice and his own legal counsel, a team of DOA attorneys, agree the measure has met those requirements “and is now effective law.”

“It is my duty to administer that law,” he said.

Huebsch’s latest comments raise questions about whether he or others could face sanctions following a hearing Tuesday, when Dane County Circuit Judge Maryann Sumi said any further implementation of the law is prohibited under a temporary court order.

“Now that I’ve made my earlier order as clear as it possibly can be, I must state that those who act in open and willful defiance of the court order place not only themselves at peril of sanctions, they also jeopardize the financial and the governmental stability of the state of Wisconsin,” Sumi said Tuesday.

(…)

Huebsch said the legal effect of Sumi’s order on his ability to implement the law is “unclear.” Changes under the law were being implemented this week, but public employees won’t see them until their April 21 paychecks, with increases in health insurance premiums and retirement contributions, as well as a stop to automatic collection of union dues, Huebsch said Monday.

Huebsch pointed out that the DOA is not a party to the lawsuit and said Sumi’s order fails to state the law is not in effect. “It is unclear how she can issue an order binding non-parties to a case who have not had their day in court,” he said.

The letter of the injunction may give Huebsch some breathing room here, but it’s quite apparent that any further implementation of the law would violate the spirit of Judge Sumi’s ruling, and that she’s likely to look unkindly on any effort to implement the law in defiance of her order.  This is likely to come up when Sumi holds another hearing in the case tomorrow, at which point she could end up expanding the scope of her injunction yet again, or sanctioning the Governor’s attorneys for violating her order.

It strikes me that Walker and the GOP are playing with fire here. Rather than trying to openly defy a Court Order, with the inevitable consequences that are likely to result, it would be far more appropriate for them to challenge the TRO through the appellate process, which they are in fact already doing. Acting in this manner carries with it the risk of being held in contempt, and as Allahpundit notes, that would only serve to hand a huge strategic victory to their opponents.




Outside the Beltway

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Hmmm.


They’re not just blindly defying the order here. The argument, as it was last week when the Legislative Reference Bureau published the law, is that the TRO only names certain parties and therefore only those parties are enjoined by it. There’s no mention of the Department of Administration in the order, so hey — the […]

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