Currently viewing the tag: “trailer”

Funny!

(h/t Yerushalimey)



Elder of Ziyon

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Funny!

(h/t Yerushalimey)



Elder of Ziyon

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Former Watford defender Jay DeMerit rose to fame in England from the depths of a seventh-tier team all the way up to the Premier League during the 2006-2007 season. While Watford’s stay in the Premier League was short-lived, DeMerit went on to…



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EPL Talk

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Joe. My. God.

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Subbuteopia – trailer from [email protected]àSintetica on Vimeo. A documentary about Subbuteo, the legendary table soccer game, is in the works and scheduled for release this year. The film includes the story of the Parodi brothers, one of the main…



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EPL Talk

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No.


Consider this not a palate cleanser but a cry for help. Explain to me, please, what it is about the original that allegedly makes it a comedy classic. (Worldwide box office gross: Almost half a billion dollars.) I went to see it and figured I’d love it to pieces; moronic gonzo comedies like Sandler’s first […]

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Simply brilliant (hat tip: Harry)

In case you are wondering how it was done, Robert Blankenheim, the creator, explains:

I am the creator of the fake trailer Titanic: Two the Surface that you may have seen on You Tube a few years ago.
I have just completed a new fake trailer for the sequel to E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. I’ve been working on it for a while and like Titanic, it took endless hours of sifting through movies and trying to paste a story together from clips that I found. I can’t tell you exactly how many movies I researched (hundreds), but I can tell you that I ended up using clips from 33 movies along with 11 shots that I had to shoot myself in order to create the trailer. Out of the 115 shots in the trailer, there are 80 effects shots ranging from simple (adding ships to the background) to difficult (animating a talking ET).

I plan on posting a few videos detailing how some of the shots were created in the near future. In the meantime, if you have any questions about either of the trailers, feel free to e-mail me. ([email protected])

Israellycool

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It’s hard to believe, but I haven’t read the conservative novel of choice, Atlas Shrugged. One day I will, and probably soon. While at CPAC, I was among the lucky bloggers who got to see substantial clips of Atlas Shrugged Part One. Even better, the film’s producer, Harmon Kaslow, discussed the movie, which will be released on April 15.

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Marathon Pundit

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He just cannot get through it.

The full gory video is here.



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The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan

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Synopsis:

When eight cadets are left behind at an isolated military high school, the greatest romantic drama ever written seeps out of the classroom and permeates their lives. Incorporating the original text of ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ YouTube videos, and lip-synced Indie rock music, Private Romeo takes us to a mysterious and tender place that only Shakespeare could have inspired.

OK then. Looks kinda porny.

Joe. My. God.

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Believe it or not, it’s going to be a trilogy. Not by coincidence, the release date is April 15th. Also uncoincidentally, the trailer has been released during CPAC.

Joe. My. God.

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I remember exactly when I became a conservative or a libertarian, to the extent that I am either. Maybe a better explanation is I remember when I decided that individuals were more important than the state. I was 14 and in the back seat of our car coming home from visiting my grandparents. My mom had given me the Fountainhead to read previously and that had led me to Atlas Shrugged. It was 12 hours there and I read almost every minute of it, I continued while we enjoyed the 4th of July and some Nebraska Summer and finished it on the ride home. I was completely blown away.

I knew instinctively that I didn’t like when people or institutions imposed their will on me. I had problems in school and elsewhere over this for most of my then young life. School was designed to ensure everyone passed and consequently ran at a lowest common denominator level. There were no advanced placement classes or other ways to keep those running at a higher level engaged. You were expected to become another cog in the great machine that would break all to the proper level of mediocrity. Well, I disconcurred and in my own way I went on strike.

 In Atlas Shrugged I heard the voices of people who believed they were beholden only to themselves. They would live their lives for no other man, and expect no other man to live his life for them. Amen to that, there was a philosophy I could get behind. It also dovetailed with my rejection of religion and provided a way to exalt the one thing I could control, my self. Now that sounds very arrogant and I would temper it by saying that this does not mean claiming some sort of god or demi-godhood for the self. It means believing that the highest goal I could achieve is to live my life to its full potential. I needed no one’s permission and didn’t need to heed anyone’s sanction.

Atlas Shrugged does a brilliant job of caricaturing both the individuals and the statists. It is excellent propaganda for the anti-statist, anti-communist/socialist view point. The designation of the statists as Looters and Moochers is so apt and so wicked that it was natural to hate them, a lot! I was livid at the actions of those bastards who believed they had a right to take the fruit of as man’s labors and appropriate it for their own purposes. I was disgusted that they would try to limit the most productive so those less capable could compete. That the strong would be forced not just to subsidize the weak, but would be bent or broken until they became equal to the weak.

Socialism and its bastard step child Social Democracy are designed to level outcomes, not playing fields. They aim to eliminate the playing field entirely and have all human events occur in scripted theater. The strong would be obligated to realize their full work potential, they just would not get to enjoy the rewards they should have earned. Rand called this the sanction of the victim, and that is what the strikers withdrew. They refused to participate in their own destruction, and the attendant destruction of a productive society. There is no socialist entity ever created that has prospered. There is a simple reason for that; if you want productivity, you must provide rewards, period. If the only reward for working better or smarter or faster is more work, then the productive will stop producing to their full potential and the system will devolve to its lowest common productivity level.

You can look at our society today and easily map it onto the Randian model. There are producers and there are looters, and while the Democrats ran Washington for the past couple of years we watched a number of Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog Rules attempted and some put in place. Buying a couple of car companies only to give them to their unions is a perfect example. The unions turned an entire group of people who used to be producers into looters represented by moochers. Unions are specifically designed to ensure that the least valuable workers are valued as highly as the most valuable. You are measured not by how much you produce or how successful you are, you are measured by your ability to keep a set of work clothes off the ground and fill a slot. Your take of the loot is determined simply by how long you have kept your clothes off the ground.

Now the book itself is a bit of a soup sandwich and is about as subtle as the Hammer of Thor. But that is not the point; this book serves a much bigger purpose than mere literature. It forces you to choose between collectivism and individualism. That is the most important cultural decision anyone makes. The book is designed to point out the absurdity of expecting the best and brightest among us to shackle themselves to the weakest and simply continue to strive out of an imposed sense of obligation. America has the highest level of charitable giving of any country on Earth, but it is not coerced. Those who give do so of their own free will, but that is not good enough for the looters and the moochers. They see the very creation of wealth as oppressive and done through exploitation, and they feel that anyone who accumulates more than they “need” should be forced to share it with those who have not managed to do so. Again, I disconcur.

 ”Run for your life from any man who tells you that money is evil. That sentence is the leper’s bell of an approaching looter.”[31]

— Francisco d’Anconia, Atlas Shrugged

When Rand turned this into her philosophy of Objectivism and herself into a cult of personality she became a fairly repellent and wicked person. You could say that is the ultimate end to employment of her individualism, or you could say she was a twisted, narcissistic bitch. In the end it doesn’t change the fact that she wrote a wonderfully evocative book that should be read by every American in Junior High. If you can read it and see the end game of social engineering and still believe it is the way to live, then the rest of us will still take care of you. But I think that a dose of Galtian wisdom might help lessen the number of parasites the productive class is forced to carry along.



BLACKFIVE

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Finally.


No joke: 40 years. Philip Klein of AmSpec got a sneak peek at the trailer last night and ended up politely panning it, describing the Randian dialogue as stilted and the attempts to link the plot to current events as too strenuous. Fair enough, but realistically is there any way to turn this book into […]

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From a Sundance Film Festival synopsis:

In the early 1970s, in the shadow of the Stonewall riots and the free-love movement, gay men and lesbians flocked to San Francisco to find acceptance. They formed a thriving, tight-knit community until the arrival of AIDS in the early 1980s drove them under siege. Director David Weissman (“The Cockettes” screened at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival) chronicles this transformative era through the stories of five individuals who lived through the best and the worst of it. In the face of unheralded tragedy, these men and women relate how they were affected and the way their community united to help those suffering and prevent further deaths.


(Tipped by JMG reader Ed)

Joe. My. God.

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Climate of violence.


Via Buzzsugar, I’m tempted to say that this concept is played out, but as a fan of zombie flicks I’m in no position. Besides, this … looks terrific, actually. It’s nothing new if you’ve seen any of the “Scream” movies, but that’s the point, of course. The whole franchise is a sustained goof on slasher-movie […]

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