Currently viewing the tag: “Than”

The situation in Syria continues to smolder:

Several deaths have been reported as anti-government protests got under way in several Syrian cities after Muslim prayers on Friday, activists have said. Protest marches against Baath Party rule demanding freedoms broke out in cities in the north and south, including the flashpoint city of Daraa. … Al Jazeera's Rula Amin, reporting from Damascus, said at least four people were killed in the afternoon after government forces started using live fire against the protesters in the Douma suburb.

The rallies, taking place for the third week in succession after Friday prayers, come two days after Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, labelled them a foreign conspiracy. Assad defied expectations during his first public address since the protests began that he would announce sweeping changes.

Witnesses in Daraa, a southern town that has been one of the main focal points of rising dissent, said hundreds gathered after leaving a mosque shouting "death rather [than] humiliation" and "national unity".

Enduring America has tons more footage from today.





Email this Article
Add to digg
Add to Reddit
Add to Twitter
Add to del.icio.us
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Facebook




The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan

Tagged with:
 

(Randy Barnett)

Although some have accounted for the imbalance between left-leaning and right-leaning law law professors on the bases of self-selection, others have maintained that conservatives are simply less intelligent than progressives. For this reason, it is suggested, conservatives (especially social conservatives, but also libertarians) either avoid academia in favor of less demanding positions in the business world, or are properly screened during the hiring process. However, a new empirical study by my co-blogger Jim Lindgren suggests that the opposite may be true. You can read about it here. As is my usual practice, I am keeping comments closed, but this is especially necessary for this post which is sure to provoke outrage among the commentariate.




The Volokh Conspiracy

Tagged with:
 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the March jobs report this morning and the news was a bit better than expected, with 216,000 new jobs created during the month and a drop of .1 percent in the unemployment rate.

There was no drop in labor force participation, which indicates that this is a real drop in unemployment rather than a fake one. The consensus expectation was for 205,000 new jobs, so this figure beats the predictions by a small margin.

Michigan Messenger

Tagged with:
 

(Eugene Volokh)

That’s what Hawaii Administrative Rules §§ 13–300-1, –32(c) seems to say (though I’m not sure there’s any actual statutory authorization for this). And William Aila, Chair of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, wrote a memo two weeks ago to “[a]ll news agencies” stressing the prohibition. (For some opinionated background on this, see here.)

But I doubt such a prohibition is constitutional. Though the First Amendment rules related to newsgathering and in particular photography are not well-settled, I think there’s enough protection recognized for photographing things (at least in a place where you are legally entitled to be) that such a ban would be struck down. If anyone knows more about what has happened to similar restrictions (if any) elsewhere, I’d love to hear it.

Thanks to Dan Devaney for the pointer.




The Volokh Conspiracy

Tagged with:
 

File the following under the category of “NO DUH”.

In a recent Rasmussen poll, only 7% of Americans believe that Government employees work harder than those in the private sector. 70%  believe workers in the private sector work harder than government workers, while 23% are too busy watching reality TV and are undecided. I think we can add those that would send America to war, sorry a kinetic military operation, while on Spring Break in Brazil.

So not only do government employees get paid more and receive better retirement benefits that the private sector … they do less for it. I guess this can explain why only 16% think the US would be better off if most incumbents in Congress were reelected and why Americans have a pretty poor view of politicians in general.

Share This

Scared Monkeys

Tagged with:
 

According to a Rasmussen Reports poll released today, just seven percent of Americans believe that government employees work harder than their counterparts in private sector. The same poll finds that 44 percent of government workers agree.

As we’ve learned recently, not only do public-sector workers get paid more than private industry employees doing comparable tasks, they get better benefits, they can retire earlier, and are much harder to fire.

Technorati tags:  

Marathon Pundit

Tagged with:
 

A truly pessimistic look at the state of the Libyan rebellion last night on CNN:




Outside the Beltway

Tagged with:
 

Senator Rand Paul took a nice little dig at Newt Gingrich, and Fox News last night at the Congressional Correspondents Dinner:

>PAUL: I was happy to see that Newt Gingrich has staked out a position on the war, a position, or two, or maybe three. I don’t know. I think he has more war positions than he’s had wives. […]

There’s a big debate over there. Fox News can’t decide, what do they love more, bombing the Middle East or bashing the president? It’s like I was over there and there was an anchor going, they were pleading, can’t we do both? Can’t we bomb the Middle East and bash the president at the same time? How are we going to make this work?




Outside the Beltway

Tagged with:
 

Senator Rand Paul took a nice little dig at Newt Gingrich, and Fox News last night at the Congressional Correspondents Dinner:

>PAUL: I was happy to see that Newt Gingrich has staked out a position on the war, a position, or two, or maybe three. I don’t know. I think he has more war positions than he’s had wives. […]

There’s a big debate over there. Fox News can’t decide, what do they love more, bombing the Middle East or bashing the president? It’s like I was over there and there was an anchor going, they were pleading, can’t we do both? Can’t we bomb the Middle East and bash the president at the same time? How are we going to make this work?




Outside the Beltway

Tagged with:
 

Plus, Gaddafi goes small-scale.


Via Jim Geraghty, who wonders how the West hitched its star to such a poorly formed and hopeless band of opponents.  Look on the bright side: at least this makes the CIA’s job of vetting the resistance a lot easier than we thought.  CNN’s Jon Lee Anderson gives Eliot Spitzer the bad news, as Moammar […]

Read this post »

Hot Air » Top Picks

Tagged with:
 

Potential GOP presidential contender Newt Gingrich has been in hot water lately after ThinkProgress caught him flipping his position on the Libyan war rapidly over the span of just a few weeks, indicating that his positions on foreign policy are more driven by politics than principle. Last night, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) spoke at the Congressional Correspondents Dinner. At one point, Paul referenced these flip-flops by Gingrich to criticize both his politically driven foreign policy positions and his infidelity to his wives. Paul also poked fun at Fox News, saying that it is having a hard time deciding what it likes more, bombing the Middle East or attacking President Obama, in deciding its opinion on Libya:

PAUL: I was happy to see that Newt Gingrich has staked out a position on the war, a position, or two, or maybe three. I don’t know. I think he has more war positions than he’s had wives. […]

There’s a big debate over there. Fox News can’t decide, what do they love more, bombing the Middle East or bashing the president? It’s like I was over there and there was an anchor going, they were pleading, can’t we do both? Can’t we bomb the Middle East and bash the president at the same time? How are we going to make this work?

Watch it:

ThinkProgress

Tagged with:
 

Potential GOP presidential contender Newt Gingrich has been in hot water lately after ThinkProgress caught him flipping his position on the Libyan war rapidly over the span of just a few weeks, indicating that his positions on foreign policy are more driven by politics than principle. Last night, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) spoke at the Congressional Correspondents Dinner. At one point, Paul referenced these flip-flops by Gingrich to criticize both his politically driven foreign policy positions and his infidelity to his wives. Paul also poked fun at Fox News, saying that it is having a hard time deciding what it likes more, bombing the Middle East or attacking President Obama, in deciding its opinion on Libya:

PAUL: I was happy to see that Newt Gingrich has staked out a position on the war, a position, or two, or maybe three. I don’t know. I think he has more war positions than he’s had wives. […]

There’s a big debate over there. Fox News can’t decide, what do they love more, bombing the Middle East or bashing the president? It’s like I was over there and there was an anchor going, they were pleading, can’t we do both? Can’t we bomb the Middle East and bash the president at the same time? How are we going to make this work?

Watch it:

ThinkProgress

Tagged with:
 

(John)

Six weeks after the Libyan revolt began and two weeks after the U.N. Security Council authorized a no-fly zone and the U.S. and others intervened on behalf of the rebels, the Obama administration has decided it had better find out who its new allies are. The Washington Post reports:

The Obama administration has sent teams of CIA operatives into Libya in a rush to gather intelligence on the identities and capabilities of rebel forces opposed to Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi, according to U.S. officials.

The information has become more crucial as the administration and its coalition partners move closer to providing direct military aid or guidance to the disorganized and beleaguered rebel army.

As I say, better late than never. The administration acknowledges that there are Islamic extremists among the rebels:

Several lawmakers briefed by Clinton, Gates and Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said they were told that the United States is still trying to put together a full picture of the Libyan rebellion but believes that it does not contain large numbers of radical Islamic militants. …

The CIA’s efforts represent a belated attempt to acquire basic information about rebel forces that had barely surfaced on the radar of U.S. spy agencies before the uprisings in North Africa.

If the Keystone Kops undertook to run foreign policy, they would be less disorganized than the Obama administration.




Power Line

Tagged with:
 

Mark Hosenball reports:

President Barack Obama has signed a secret order authorizing covert U.S. government support for rebel forces seeking to oust Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, government officials told Reuters on Wednesday.

Doug Mataconis wonders who leaked the info and why. Douthat sees a pattern:

No sooner had the president finished speaking than the Times’s Eric Schmitt came out with a story undercutting the idea that America can be just be one partner among many in the Libyan operation. (American military involvement, Schmitt reported, “is far deeper than discussed in public and more instrumental to the fight than was previously known.”) The next day in London, representatives of the allied powers took turns insisting that regime change was, in fact, the coalition’s goal in Libya. And 24 hours later, with Qaddafi’s forces counterattacking and the rebels falling back in disarray, American policymakers find themselves furiously debating whether our air campaign needs to be supplemented by an effort to arm the rebels directly — which would obviously represent a further escalation of the conflict, and one that would arguably fall outside the United Nations mandate that we claim to be enforcing.





Email this Article
Add to digg
Add to Reddit
Add to Twitter
Add to del.icio.us
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Facebook




The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan

Tagged with:
 

A new study finds that all those aircraft condensation trails you see across the sky may, on any given day, be warming the planet more than all the CO2 emitted by all the planes since the Wright Brothers’ first flew over a century ago.

The study is “Global radiative forcing from contrail cirrus” (subs. req’d) in Nature Climate Change by Ulrike Burkhardt1 and Bernd Kärcher of the DLR German Aerospace Center. That the climate forcing from airplanes is considerably greater than just that of their CO2 emissions has been known a long time.

What this study adds is an analysis of an “important but poorly understood component of this forcing,” namely contrail cirrus—”a type of cloud that consist of young line-shaped contrails and the older irregularly shaped contrails that arise from them.”  It turns out that “the radiative forcing associated with contrail cirrus as a whole is about nine times larger than that from line-shaped contrails alone.”  On the bright side, “contrail cirrus cause a significant decrease in natural cloudiness, which partly offsets their warming effect.”

Nature CC’s news story has this explanation and satellite images:

Aircraft-engine emissions are mostly composed of carbon dioxide, water vapour, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and aerosol particles. As well as the direct effect that these emissions have on climate, aviation has an added impact induced by the formation of condensation trails (contrails) in the wake of the aircraft. These line-shaped trails are formed by the mixing of hot, moist air coming out of the engine with cold ambient air. When the atmosphere is supersaturated with respect to ice, the line-shaped contrails can spread to form cirrus cloud, which has a warming effect on climate.  [Fig. 1, click to enlarge]

Satellite infrared images of contrails spreading into cirrus clouds over the UK.

The young contrails, which appear as a spring shape and sharp lines in the first image, gradually spread into cirrus clouds, which appear as bright white areas in the lower images. The time of each image and the satellite used to take it are shown in the inset of each frame. Burkhardt and Kärcher used a model that simulates this spreading process to assess the warming effects of contrails and the cirrus clouds that form from them. Their results indicate that so-called spreading contrails cause an order of magnitude more climate warming than the line-shaped contrails alone, and are the largest single climate-forcing agent associated with aviation.

Here are some more details:

Burkhardt and Kärcher developed a process-based model of how contrails form, grow (through the depletion of water vapour in the surrounding air), spread and finally disappear (through mixing and fall-out of the ice crystals). By tracking the fate of contrail and natural cirrus separately, the authors can quantify the radiative forcing from spreading contrails (including young line-shaped contrails), which they estimate to be 38 mW m−2. This can be compared with a radiative forcing of 4 mW m−2 from young contrails alone and 28 mW m−2 from aviation carbon dioxide. Interestingly, spreading-contrail cirrus clouds cause a reduction in natural cirrus, because they modify the water budget in the upper troposphere; however, this reduction in natural cirrus is relatively small (-7 mW m−2).

The lead author Ulrike Burkhardt told Reuters, “You can get rid of contrails very quickly. You can’t get rid of CO2 quickly.”  As Nature put it:

Overall, and despite their short lifetime, contrails may have more radiative impact at any one time than all of the aviation-emitted carbon dioxide that has accumulated in the atmosphere since the beginning of commercial aviation. It is important to note, however, that the emitted carbon dioxide would continue to exert a warming influence for much longer than contrails, should all aircraft be grounded indefinitely.

Yes, well, that ain’t gonna happen.

The question arises as to whether changing the flight pattern of aircraft or perhaps their engine technology could ameliorate this problem:

These findings are important, because if the calculations of Burkhardt and Kärcher are correct, they provide a basis to develop mitigation strategies to reduce the impact of aviation on climate. For instance, it has been suggested that flight routes or flight altitudes could be planned and altered in real time to avoid parts of the atmosphere that are supersaturated with respect to ice8, 9. Even though this would help to reduce both young and spreading contrails, such a strategy is likely to lead to an increase in fuel consumption. It would be important to make sure that, given the large difference in atmospheric lifetime of carbon dioxide and contrails, the associated carbon dioxide penalty does not offset in the longer term the gain obtained by avoiding contrail formation10.

The results by Burkhardt and Kärcher might also justify the development of a novel engine concept that seeks to condense a fraction of the water vapour in aircraft emissions in a cooling unit before it leaves the engine11. The condensed water could be vented in the form of large ice crystals or droplets that would fall quickly through the atmosphere. Reducing the content of water vapour in the engine exhaust would make contrail formation less likely.

Certainly this is an important area for continued work.

Climate Progress

Tagged with: