Currently viewing the tag: “stone”

Former Soviet dictator Mikhail Gorbachev celebrated his 80th birthday with a bash in London on Wednesday.  And celebrities were out in force to glorify the life of a dictator.  Tickets went as high as $ 160,000. Talk about surreal: the co-hosts were Sharon Stone and and Kevin Spacey.  Entertainment was provided by the aging rock bank The Scorpions. Sporty Spice of the Spice Girls (now Mel C) also showed up.

It was all wrapped around the theme “Mikhail Gorbachev: The Man Who Changed the World.”  The Moscow Times reports that Spacey and Stone were, err, “cheesy.”  Standing in front of neo-classical columns “decorated with pink curtains,”  the two co-hosts “continuously mangled various Russian names and concepts.”  Stone (who they described as “ditzy”) went through a number of dress changes and Spacey tried to crack a joke about perestroika that was, well, “mangled.”    In between The Scorpions sang their songs “Wind of Change”  and later “Rock You Like A Hurricane.” Spandex anyone?

Ted Turner was given an award.  Then came a Russian pop group named Khor Turetskogo singing the old black spiritual,  ”Go Down Moses.”  Strange choice if you are celebrating the birthday of an atheist,  don’t you think? You can’t make this stuff up.

Famous Soviet dissident Vladimir Bukovsky tried to remind London about who they were celebrating.  He filed a lawsuit to have Gorbachev arrested for his crimes as Soviet leader.  Bukovsky points out that among other things Gorbachev ordered the violent break-up of several demonstrations between 1989-1991 which led to the death of 100 people. But his request was rejected by a London Court on the grounds that Gorbachev was in the UK as part of a “Special Mission” on behalf of the Russian state.  The fact is, of course, that he has absolutely no official position in the Russian government.

At a time when everyone is reporting on the alleged demise of the dictator in the Middle East how strange that they celebrate one from a different region and a previous era.  Gorbachev was not elected,  and he rejected democracy in favor of a “leading role” for the communist party.  Events passed him up.  He didn’t lead Russia to a democratic system.   Just shows you that for the Left the Universal Law of Dictators is simple: dictators on the right bad; dictators on the left,  throw them a party!

Big Peace

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Not somewhere I would want to be…

Regardless of your individual opinion of Michael Yon, this story is drawing fire from about every hasty and prepared firing position that can reach it from their sector. 

Evidently, Rolling Stone magazine is doing it’s level best to attract more mouth-breathing leftist lunatics to the ranks of their subscribers by attempting to take what has been called President Obama’s “Abu Ghraib” (with virtually ZERO coverage in the Old Media BTW) and mold it and shape it to fit their warped libturd world view.  Not that anyone would be surprised by this, but this steaming pile of cat guano that passes for something the editors at Rolling Stone blessed off on as acceptable for general consumption for all and called by the title “journalism” is being called out.

As it should be.  By someone who was there and can stand to rebut such rubbish…

Seldom do I waste time with rebutting articles, and especially not from publications like Rolling Stone. Today, numerous people sent links to the latest Rolling Stone tripe. The story is titled “THE KILL TEAM, THE FULL STORY.” It should be titled: “BULLSHIT, from Rolling Stone.”

The story—not really an “article”—covers Soldiers from 5/2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT) in Afghanistan. A handful of Soldiers were accused of murder. It does in fact appear that a tiny group of rogues committed premeditated murder. I was embedded with the 5/2 SBCT and was afforded incredible access to the brigade by the Commander, Colonel Harry Tunnell, and the brigade Command Sergeant Major, Robb Prosser. I know Robb from Iraq. Colonel Tunnell had been shot in Iraq.

The brigade gave me open access. I could go anywhere, anytime, so long as I could find a ride, which never was a problem beyond normal combat problems. If they had something to hide, it was limited and I didn’t find it. I was not with the Soldiers accused of murder and had no knowledge of this. It is important to note that the murder allegations were not discovered by media vigilance, but by, for instance, at least one Soldier in that tiny unit who was appalled by the behavior. A brigade is a big place with thousands of Soldiers, and in Afghanistan they were spread thinly across several provinces because we decided to wage war with too few troops. Those Soldiers accused of being involved in (or who should have been knowledgeable of) the murders could fit into a minivan. You would need ten 747s for the rest of the Brigade who did their duty. I was with many other Soldiers from 5/2 SBCT. My overall impression was very positive. After scratching my memory for negative impressions from 5/2 Soldiers, I can’t think of any, actually, other than the tiny Kill Team who, to my knowledge, I never set eyes upon.

Steel on target Michael.  These court jesters running wild in their asshaters menagerie needed to be called out and given the good news that there is definitely another side to this whole story. A story about how everyone else seemed to be able to do their duty, except these warts on the behind of the US Armed Forces who decided the line between “combat” and “murder” was a wee bit too blurry for them to care about the difference.

And for all you fellas in the head shed that stop by here now and then to check on us and what we are doing; FFS, why in the world, if the military wants to be the ones controlling the message and deciding through occuptions like PSYOPS, INFOSEC, INFO OPS, Civil Affairs and such, would they let people from such low rent publications like Rolling Stone be embedded, have press access or have any access at all to do these kinds of stories.  Asshats like Matt Taibbi and his ilk over there have an agenda, and it definitely isn’t to tell the whole truth, nor to keep it in the larger context.

Everyone else “manages the message” so why not the US Military?  Hello… is this thing on?  If you need some help in running something like this I can send over my resume…

I would prefer that the hacks at Rolling Stone went back to things that have no taste in and no talent for; music.  Let the grown ups do the work of digging for the truth and telling the stories.  I can’t believe Earth First lets them kill trees to print their bovine scatology.  Without naked pictures of stars from a vampire show on cable TV, Rolling Stone would be even more irrelevant… 

On the plus side, I think I found a substitute for the liner in Mrs. Deebow’s kitty’s privy… 



BLACKFIVE

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Seldom do I waste time with rebutting articles, and especially not from publications like Rolling Stone.  Today, numerous people sent links to the latest Rolling Stone tripe.  The story is titled “THE KILL TEAM, THE FULL STORY.”  It should be titled: “BULLSHIT, from Rolling Stone.”

The story—not really an “article”—covers Soldiers from 5/2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT) in Afghanistan.  A handful of Soldiers were accused of murder.  It does in fact appear that a tiny group of rogues committed premeditated murder.  I was embedded with the 5/2 SBCT and was afforded incredible access to the brigade by the Commander, Colonel Harry Tunnell, and the brigade Command Sergeant Major, Robb Prosser.  I know Robb from Iraq.  Colonel Tunnell had been shot in Iraq.

The brigade gave me open access.  I could go anywhere, anytime, so long as I could find a ride, which never was a problem beyond normal combat problems.  If they had something to hide, it was limited and I didn’t find it.  I was not with the Soldiers accused of murder and had no knowledge of this.  It is important to note that the murder allegations were not discovered by media vigilance, but by, for instance, at least one Soldier in that tiny unit who was appalled by the behavior.  A brigade is a big place with thousands of Soldiers, and in Afghanistan they were spread thinly across several provinces because we decided to wage war with too few troops.  Those Soldiers accused of being involved in (or who should have been knowledgeable of) the murders could fit into a minivan.  You would need ten 747s for the rest of the Brigade who did their duty.  I was with many other Soldiers from 5/2 SBCT.  My overall impression was very positive.  After scratching my memory for negative impressions from 5/2 Soldiers, I can’t think of any, actually, other than the tiny Kill Team who, to my knowledge, I never set eyes upon.

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Seldom do I waste time with rebutting articles, and especially not from publications like Rolling Stone.  Today, numerous people sent links to the latest Rolling Stone tripe.  The story is titled “THE KILL TEAM, THE FULL STORY.”  It should be titled: “BULLSHIT, from Rolling Stone.”

The story—not really an “article”—covers Soldiers from 5/2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT) in Afghanistan.  A handful of Soldiers were accused of murder.  It does in fact appear that a tiny group of rogues committed premeditated murder.  I was embedded with the 5/2 SBCT and was afforded incredible access to the brigade by the Commander, Colonel Harry Tunnell, and the brigade Command Sergeant Major, Robb Prosser.  I know Robb from Iraq.  Colonel Tunnell had been shot in Iraq.

The brigade gave me open access.  I could go anywhere, anytime, so long as I could find a ride, which never was a problem beyond normal combat problems.  If they had something to hide, it was limited and I didn’t find it.  I was not with the Soldiers accused of murder and had no knowledge of this.  It is important to note that the murder allegations were not discovered by media vigilance, but by, for instance, at least one Soldier in that tiny unit who was appalled by the behavior.  A brigade is a big place with thousands of Soldiers, and in Afghanistan they were spread thinly across several provinces because we decided to wage war with too few troops.  Those Soldiers accused of being involved in (or who should have been knowledgeable of) the murders could fit into a minivan.  You would need ten 747s for the rest of the Brigade who did their duty.  I was with many other Soldiers from 5/2 SBCT.  My overall impression was very positive.  After scratching my memory for negative impressions from 5/2 Soldiers, I can’t think of any, actually, other than the tiny Kill Team who, to my knowledge, I never set eyes upon.

The online edition of the Rolling Stone story contains a section with a video called “Motorcycle Kill,” which includes our Soldiers gunning down Taliban who were speeding on a motorcycle toward our guys.  These Soldiers were also with 5/2 SBCT, far away from the “Kill Team” later accused of the murders.  Rolling Stone commits a literary “crime” by deceptively entwining this normal combat video with the Kill Team story.  The Taliban on the motorcycle were killed during an intense operation in the Arghandab near Kandahar City.  People who have been to the Arghandab realize the extreme danger there.  The Soviets got beaten horribly in the Arghandab, despite throwing everything including the Soviet kitchen sink into the battle that lasted over a month.  Others fared little better.  To my knowledge, 5/2 and supporting units were the first ever to take Arghandab, and these two dead Taliban were part of that process.

The killing of the armed Taliban on the motorcycle was legal and within the rules of engagement.  Law and ROE are related but separate matters.  In any case, the killing was well within both the law and ROE.  The Taliban on the back of the motorcycle raised his rifle to fire at our Soldiers but the rifle did not fire.  I talked at length with several of the Soldiers who were there and they gave me the video.  There was nothing to hide.  I didn’t even know about the story until they told me.  It can be good for Soldiers to shoot and share videos because it provides instant replay and lessons learned.  When they gave me the video and further explained what happened, I found the combat so normal that I didn’t even bother publishing it, though I should have because that little shooting of the two Taliban was the least of the accomplishments of these Soldiers, and it rid the Arghandab of two Taliban.

Some people commented that our Soldiers used excessive force by firing too many bullets.  Hogwash.  And besides, they were trying to kill each other.  Anyone who has seen much combat with our weak M-4 rifles realizes that one shot is generally not enough, and the Taliban were speeding at them on a motorbike, which very often are prepared as suicide bombs.  If that motorcycle had been a bomb, as they often are, and got inside the group of Soldiers and exploded, they could all have been killed.  Just yesterday, in Paktika, three suicide attackers came in, guns blazing, and detonated a huge truck bomb.  Depending on which reports you read, about twenty workers were killed and about another fifty wounded.

In the video, our guys would have been justified in firing twice that many bullets, but at some point you are wasting ammo and that is a combat sin.  The Soldiers involved in that shooting told me that the Taliban on the back may have pulled the AK trigger, but the loaded AK did not fire because the Taliban didn’t have a round in the chamber.  Attention to detail.  At least one also had an ammunition rack strapped across his chest.

This could go on for pages, but Rolling Stone is not worth it, and thrashing them might only build their readership.  I’ve found in the past that boycotts work.  I led a boycott against one magazine and it went bankrupt.  It’s doubtful that Rolling Stone will go bankrupt for its sins, but you can cost them money not by boycotting their magazine, but by boycotting their advertisers.  That hurts.  Just pick an advertiser whose products you already buy, boycott it, and tell the advertiser why you are not buying their product.

Now I’ve got to get back to work.


Thank you for the incredible words of support and encouragement. I am returning to Afghanistan in February for a combination of work with our military forces, and ‘Lone Ranger writing’ away from our troops. Your support is crucial. Please consider using Paypal, or my Post Office Box, or other Methods of Support. Again, thank you for all!

Your Writer,

Michael Yon


Big Journalism

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Stephenson's Jafar Mann was not doing the "Gator chomp" here. He was clapping in celebration of his team's win over Parkview last fall. (AJC photo by Jason Getz)

Stephenson's Jafar Mann was not doing the "Gator chomp" here. He was clapping in celebration of his team's win over Parkview last fall. (AJC photo by Jason Getz)

Stephenson defensive tackle Jafar Mann on Friday became the second player from his school to commit to the Florida Gators. And if he has anything to do with it he won’t be the last.

The 6-foot-4, 285-pound rising senior joined running back teammate Mike Davis in pledging Florida. The Gators are also in hot pursuit of Stephenson defensive end Jarontay Jones and linebacker Raphael Kirby. All four players have in excess of a dozen scholarship offers apiece so far.

Mann said there is a chance all four players will play together at Florida. “I’d say it’s a strong possibility,” he said.

These things can definitely seem subject to momentum. Mann admitted that Davis, who was the first to commit to the Gators on Feb. 19, definitely helped sway him toward UF. And they, in turn, plan to work on their teammates.

“He was an …

AJC College Sports Recruiting

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But deep down, they really, really want peace. “Desecration, attacks at ancient Jewish cemetery,” by Josh Lederman for the Associated Press, March 23 (thanks to Bill):

JERUSALEM (AP) — A wide patch of steep hillside overlooking Jerusalem’s Old City holds row after row of graves. Biblical prophets, revered rabbis and a prime minister are buried there. Yet many of the tombstones have been smashed, litter is strewn around and tethered donkeys defecate on top of graves….

The cemetery is believed to hold the graves of biblical prophets Haggai, Malachi and Zechariah. The list of modern Jewish figures buried there includes Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Eliezer Ben-Yehuda, the father of modern Hebrew, and Nobel Prize laureate Shai Agnon.

Rabbi Avraham Kook, the chief rabbi of British Mandatory Palestine, and Rabbi Shlomo Goren, a former chief rabbi of Israel, are also buried there.

Some Israelis claim Palestinians from surrounding east Jerusalem neighborhoods attack visitors two to three times a week, sometimes stoning funeral processions. They accuse Arabs of building illegally on top of graves, using tombstones as goalposts for soccer games and lobbing firebombs to desecrate the cemetery.

At a recent visit to the cemetery, Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, said he’s heard from hundreds of families in the U.S. who can’t visit buried relatives without protection from armed guards.

“If you hear the families, the pain and the fact that they’re afraid to come here, what does it say?” Hoenlein asked. “In Jerusalem, Jews can’t go and visit an ancient burial site that is supposedly sacred?”…

Jihad Watch

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110121515

Euan Mearns opines:

This is already the worst civil nuclear power accident in recorded history – Chernobyl was a military reactor and the Windscale reactor fire in England in 1957 was never properly recorded. The social and economic costs I believe will already exceed Chernobyl given the location of this event close to the heart of the world’s third largest economy. … Decisions made now in the wake of an emergency in Japan may sow the seed of energy poverty in countries like the UK for decades to come.

Josh Green differs. In America, he thinks "the prospects for a deal on more nuclear power may yet survive."

(Photo: People demonstrate in solidarity with Japan and to call for the halt of the production of nuclear energy in front of Bugey's nuclear plant on March 15, 2011 in Saint-Vulbas near Lyon, France. By Jean-Phillippe Ksiazek/AFP/Getty Images)





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The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan

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“Iran’s presence will be a real affront to women, but it will also show how the UN is back to business-as-usual despite the great fanfare this week surrounding the action it took on Libya.” Yep.

“Iran joins UN’s global body on the status of women,” by Steven Edwards for Postmedia News, March 5 (thanks to J.S.B.):

The UN quietly made way for Iran to join the global body’s Commission on the Status of Women on Friday, just days after very publicly suspending Libya from its Human Rights Council. The Islamic Republic, which last year sentenced a supposedly adulterous woman to death by stoning and deploys police to harass women not deemed to be sufficiently covered, became one of the commission’s 45 members as part of a group of 11 incoming countries.

The UN General Assembly elected or — in Iran’s case — named by acclamation members last April to serve for four years but they are only now taking their positions. “Iran’s presence will be a real affront to women, but it will also show how the UN is back to business-as-usual despite the great fanfare this week surrounding the action it took on Libya,” said Anne Bayefsky, a Canadian political science professor who heads the monitoring group Eye on the UN. UN officials say agencies must take into account the principle of equitable regional representation when offering membership spots.

Jihad Watch

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The strange, chimerical Donald Trump presidential flotation is widely expected to dissolve at the point it either prevents a television station from giving him free airtime or requires that he discloses details of his oft-disputed claims to great wealth.

Still, it’s being fueled to the hilt at the moment, with an adviser in Des Moines today and a notionally independent "Draft Trump" movement up and and running.

A reader, though, noted a curious fact about "Draft Trump": Though notionally helmed by a public-spirited young veteran in St. Louis (above), the contact number listed on some of its press releases is the same number listed for the stunt 2010 stunt campaign of Kristen Davis for governor of New York, a convicted madam who claimed to have procured prostitutes for Eliot Spitzer.

The number is answered by Andrew Miller, who while volunteering for Davis’s campaign was paid by Carl Paladino’s, an arrangement the Times described as "highly unusual." He’s also reportedly the stepson of the long-time assistant to one…Roger Stone.

I asked Miller a couple of weeks ago what exactly Trump, Davis, and Paladino have in common.

"Nothing — i’m helping out a buddy of mine," he said. "He started this and he asked me for a little bit of help …. all i did was point him in a direction."

Quite the coincidence, that.

Stone, incidentally, has at times been on Trump’s payroll but "isn’t part of any official Trump organization."





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Ben Smith’s Blog

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Thursday, Rolling Stone made waves with a story claiming the U.S. Army was illegally deploying psychological operations against Congress. Last night, WSJ’s Julian Barnes confirms what I’d seen buzzing on Twitter Thursday evening:  the chief accuser was not a psyops officer at all.

An Army officer who accused a top general in Afghanistan of using “psychological operations” against visiting lawmakers in an article in Rolling Stone magazine was not trained in the military specialty, Defense Department officials said.

The U.S. Army’s Special Operations Command announced Friday that their special warfare center has no record of training Lt. Col. Michael Holmes in “psychological operations.”  In an interview, Lt. Col. Holmes said he received training in information operations and how to use the psychological operation techniques but never claimed to have been trained as a psy-ops officer.

[…]

Although the senior officers in Afghanistan asked members of the military to refrain from discussing the case, officers speaking privately rallied to the defense of Gen. Caldwell on Friday. Several officers said that almost immediately after taking command, Gen. Caldwell determined it was inappropriate for a training command to try engage in information operations or try to influence any audiences with deception or other psychological operations techniques.

Military officers said that following that decision, Lt. Col. Holmes was reassigned to a strategic communications team that was tasked, in part, prepare the command for visits by congressional delegations.

Col. Holmes said he was asked to prepare background briefings on how to persuade congressional delegations on the importance of the training mission. But asking an officer trained in information operations to do the job of a public affairs officer is improper and illegal, Lt. Col. Holmes said. “What they wanted me to do is figure out what we had to say to a congressional delegation or think tank group to get them to agree with us,” he said. “Honestly this is pretty innocuous stuff. If I was a public affairs officer, it wouldn’t be that bad.”  Lt. Col. Holmes compared the request to asking a CIA officer to investigate a criminal in the U.S. It would be illegal for the intelligence officer to do tasks that are perfectly appropriate for a regular police officer.

But a military officer who served with Lt. Col. Holmes and under Gen. Caldwell said the accusation is baseless, and that the officer was specifically told not to use information operations techniques. The officer declined to allow his name to be used because the command in Afghanistan has asked people not to discuss the case. “I don’t know of any regulation that would say someone trained in info ops or psy-ops couldn’t put together a briefing packet,” said the officer who served with Lt. Col. Holmes. “There wasn’t any subliminal messages here. It was just look at what issues a lawmaker was championing so we can get our message out.”

In fairness to Holmes, most of the psyops hype was supplied by Michael Hastings, the Rolling Stone reporter. But it’s looking more an more like Raymond Pritchett‘s initial assessment of Holmes’ charges, that they are motivated by his sense that being tasked to prepare VIP briefings was beneath his talents, is right.




Outside the Beltway

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Another bombshell report from Rolling Stone, which has learned that an American military team tasked with conducting psychological operations or “Psy-Ops” in Afghanistan was ordered by superiors to illegally target US lawmakers. The goal: to get more troops and more funding for the Afghan war. From the Rolling Stone bombshell report: The orders came from […]
The Reid Report

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(CNN) – Gen. David Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, is ordering an investigation into a scathing Rolling Stone magazine report that says the Army ordered soldiers trained in “psychological operations” to manipulate visiting lawmakers to secure more troops and funding for the war, the military said Thursday.

A lieutenant colonel told the magazine that a military team at Afghanistan’s Camp Eggers was ordered by Gen. William Caldwell, a three-star general in charge of training Afghan troops, to perform psychological operations on visiting VIPs over a four-month period last year.


CNN Political Ticker

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by Javier Manjarres

Longtime politico Roger Stone, is in full support of Governor Rick Scott’s decision to refuse Government dollars for the proposed High Speed rail in Florida. Stone says the Governor shows ” uncommon political courage” by refusing to accept ‘stimulus’ funds for a rail system that will in no doubt turn out to be a bust for taxpayers- ” a sink whole, a money loser, a train that could never make money”, as Stone puts it.

Stone however, feels that a speed rail route between Orlando and Miami would be a better choice than the already proposed Orlando-Tampa. Stone then goes on to give  ” Stoney’  advise to Congressman Allen West about mastering being a Congressman before seeking higher office.


The Shark Tank

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Longtime Donald Trump adviser Roger Stone is  legendary smoke-and-mirrors man, and his involvement — his highest-profile client last cycle was Kristen Davis, a convicted madam who claimed, but never proved, to have provided services to Eliot Spitzer — is a mark of how seriously Trump’s presidential fliration should be taken.

Stone is also a sharp guy, and here’s his (Trump-boosting) analysis of the coming cycle:

The Networks have created TWO contests - one in 2011 and another in 2012. 

…The first May debate is at the blue-chip Ronald Reagan Presidential Library May 2 and will be broadcast by MSNBC, CNBC and Telemundo. A second May debate will be held in South Carolina broadcast by Fox on May 5. It is not clear how many formally announced candidates there will be by then and how prospective candidates like Mike Huckabee and Donald Trump will be handled. Mitt Romney, doggedly following the George H.W. Bush playbook, will be in by then and will have rounded up everybody with three names in the GOP .

…What [the early debates and straw polls do] is create a faux race for nomination which precede the real legal nomination. It takes public interest out of the real nomination process by winnowing out losers in 2011 without ever counting real votes. Three boring debate performances and your money and credibility will dry up. A dark horse like Trump could run the tables in the debates and lead in the polls by years end, making a late formal entry. News events will still dominate the days before the Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, South Carolina and Florida primaries.

Will whoever wins 2011 win 2012? Will 2011 and it’s high profile debates before voters are focused or interested just narrow the Field? Candidates like Romney and Giuliani could be shop worn by 2012, Pawlenty and Daniels will have fizzled by then and Haley Barbour will have kept his powder dry. Real Estate Magnate Donald Trump could dominate 2011 debates and emerge as a real candidate.

I’m not sure I buy the Trump possibility, but it’s an analysis with consequences for all the potential candidates. 





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Ben Smith’s Blog

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Carl Paladino, who is unfortunately (for the press) not seeking a Congressional seat — weighs in on Chris Lee’s quick fall:

With the facts that I know, I don’t think he should have resigned. We want someone perfect? He didn’t commit a crime. He had a bad moment.





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