Top Black Democrat Bends Over For Back of The Bus Treatment From Pelosi

November 14, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

No3Dream:DaybyDayCartoon

(hat tip, Chris Muir at the one and only Day by Day)

My, my.

Let no one deny that San Fran Nan understands the Democrat Plantation system.

Faced with ‘uppity’ Black Democrat Jim Clyburn,(D-SC) the ex-Whip pushing to retain his position against White Democrat Steny Hoyer(D-MD), Nancy Pelosi went into action and pushed Hoyer as her pick for the Number two slot of whip as she becomes Minority Leader. And then, she demoted Clyburn to an imaginary ‘assistant leader’ number three slot she just suddenly created, one that doesn’t even have a specific duties!

And Clyburn? He was sho’ nuff grateful, and reached out to his fellow Congressional Black Caucus members, some of whom were a little uncomfortable with all this:

“With your support of Nancy’s proposal, I hope to continue to work towards building consensus within our caucus and bridges to communities and constituents across the country.”

Heh!

I could be wrong, but I get the feeling more and more Black folks are starting to look at things like this and reconsider their lockstep in the Democrat Party plantation.


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J O S H U A P U N D I T

Name That Party: Another Criminal Democrat Goes Unidentified by Old Media

November 14, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

-By Warner Todd Huston

Every now and again I like to play “name that party.” This is the fun parlor game where you read a story about a politician that has either been indicted, arrested, or imprisoned and try to guess by the story from which party he hails. If you read the story and no political party affiliation is mentioned, 99 out of 100 times you can be sure that the troubled pol is a Democrat. However, if it is a Republican that is going to jail or to court his party usually makes the first paragraph if not the headline itself.

Well, today we have yet another edition of “name that party” going on in the Old Line State where Prince George’s County Executive Jack B. Johnson and his wife Leslie have been arrested and charged with tampering with a witness in connection with a criminal offense and destruction of evidence in a federal investigation. Johnson is a Democrat, not that the news helps you learn that little factoid.

As this is breaking news, the story has popped up on the AP, the Washington Post, Reuters, and several other sources. The stories are filled with all sorts of details about the case, what the charges are, the particulars of the crime, the names and offices of those accused, their ages, where they live… all these things fill the various stories that announce the arrest. But one tiny little detail seems to have escaped many of the news stories: the fact that Johnson is a Democrat. It seems like they just plum forgot to mention his political party.

You are shocked, I am sure.

First off, the Washington Post featured the story on its Breaking News Blog. Lots of details of the story are reported there but that one little ol’ detail concerning Johnson’s party seems to have missed the editor’s attention. That bit was mysteriously absent from the tale. The Post has another posting of updates on the story, too. It also does not mention the man’s party.

The Associated Press has a short story out on the arrests. No party mention there. Its little longer treatment also does not mention Johnson’s political affiliation.

Not surprisingly, Reuters also somehow forgot to mention that Johnson is a Democrat.

Similarly, the Maryland Gazette seemed to have a small slip in its coverage by not mentioning that Johnson is a Democrat.

So what about CNN? You guessed it. They forgot, too.

WUSA Channel 9 also forgot to mention that old “D” word.

Not every news agency “forgot” to mention that Johnson was a Democrat, to be sure. USA Today remembered it. The Baltimore Sun did, too.

Finally, even though its several shorter stories did not contain the dreaded “D” word, the Associated Press did have a full length story that mentioned Johnson’s party. Naturally, the AP employed that well known method of burying it at the end of the piece where fewer readers will see it instead of putting it at the top like they do when they are reporting on troubled Republicans.

I am sure there are others, but this was my little perusal of the media’s treatment of this story.

In any case, you can be sure that if Jack B. Johnson was “Republican Jack B. Johnson” his party affiliation would have led as the first fact of every story you’d have read on his plight.

And there you have the “name that party” game.

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Stop The ACLU

Name That Party: Another Criminal Democrat Goes Unidentified by Old Media

November 13, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Every now and again I like to play “name that party.” This is the fun parlor game where you read a story about a politician that has either been indicted, arrested, or imprisoned and try to guess by the story from which party he hails. If you read the story and no political party affiliation is mentioned, 99 out of 100 times you can be sure that the troubled pol is a Democrat. However, if it is a Republican that is going to jail or to court his party usually makes the first paragraph if not the headline itself.

Well, today we have yet another edition of “name that party” going on in the Old Dominion where Prince George’s County Executive Jack B. Johnson and his wife Leslie have been arrested and charged with tampering with a witness in connection with a criminal offense and destruction of evidence in a federal investigation. Johnson is a Democrat, not that the news helps you learn that little factoid.

As this is breaking news, the story has popped up on the AP, the Washington Post, Reuters, and several other sources. The stories are filled with all sorts of details about the case, what the charges are, the particulars of the crime, the names and offices of those accused, their ages, where they live… all these things fill the various stories that announce the arrest. But one tiny little detail seems to have escaped many of the news stories: the fact that Johnson is a Democrat. It seems like they just plum forgot to mention his political party.

You are shocked, I am sure.

First off, the Washington Post featured the story on its Breaking News Blog. Lots of details of the story are reported there but that one little ol’ detail concerning Johnson’s party seems to have missed the editor’s attention. That bit was mysteriously absent from the tale. The Post has another posting of updates on the story, too. It also does not mention the man’s party.

The Associated Press has a short story out on the arrests. No party mention there. Its little longer treatment also does not mention Johnson’s political affiliation.

Not surprisingly, Reuters also somehow forgot to mention that Johnson is a Democrat.

Similarly, the Maryland Gazette seemed to have a small slip in its coverage by not mentioning that Johnson is a Democrat.

So what about CNN? You guessed it. They forgot, too.

WUSA Channel 9 also forgot to mention that old “D” word.

Not every news agency “forgot” to mention that Johnson was a Democrat, to be sure. USA Today remembered it. The Baltimore Sun did, too.

Finally, even though its several shorter stories did not contain the dreaded “D” word, the Associated Press did have a full length story that mentioned Johnson’s party. Naturally, the AP employed that well known method of burying it at the end of the piece where fewer readers will see it instead of putting it at the top like they do when they are reporting on troubled Republicans.

I am sure there are others, but this was my little perusal of the media’s treatment of this story.

In any case, you can be sure that if Jack B. Johnson was “Republican Jack B. Johnson” his party affiliation would have led as the first fact of every story you’d have read on his plight.

And there you have the “name that party” game.


Big Journalism

Republican Tom Foley Concedes Governor’s Race; No Legal Challenge; Will Call Democrat Dannel Malloy To Concede

November 12, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Republican Tom Foley conceded the gubernatorial election Monday to Democrat Dannel Malloy, saying that various problems with voting in Bridgeport were not enough to overturn the outcome of the race.

The official results show that Foley lost by more than 5,600 votes out of more than 1.1 million cast – a tiny percentage and the closest governor’s race in Connecticut in more than 55 years. For nearly a week, Republicans focused on problems in Bridgeport, which ran out of ballots and switched to photocopied ballots in a mistake-ridden process.

“I am confident that a recount that included the photocopied ballots would not change the outcome of the governor’s race,” Foley told reporters in Hartford. ”Once all of this information was available to me this morning, deciding what to do was easy. I have told my team that I am not going to pursue a legal challenge to exclude photocopied ballots.”

Foley, a former U.S. ambassador to Ireland who was making his first race for elective office, described the election last week as “a conclusive victory for Dan Malloy.”

 ”This result should not be questioned,” Foley said. “I hope my supporters will accept my word on this.”

Foley’s concession marked the end of a chaotic, Florida-style election that was supposed to end Tuesday night and continued without a conclusive result for nearly one more week. It also marked the end of a two-year odyssey that included more than a dozen candidates for governor after Republican Gov. M. Jodi Rell said she would not seek re-election.

Malloy is the first Democrat to be elected as governor in Connecticut since Gov. William A. O’Neill won re-election in 1986. Since then, independent Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. and Republicans John G. Rowland and M. Jodi Rell have occupied the governor’s office at the state Capitol.

“I want to offer my personal congratulations to Governor-elect Malloy,” Rell said in a statement. “I also extend my appreciation to both candidates for the patience they have shown during the extraordinary and often trying days that have followed the election. My office stands ready to work hand-in-hand with the Governor-elect and his team in the coming weeks. Our common goal will always be the very best interests of the people of this great state.”

Foley spent more than $ 10 million of his own money on the race in a bitter battle that included negative campaign commercials by both sides and repeated accusations about which candidate was telling the truth. Malloy also defeated another Greenwich multimillionaire, Ned Lamont, who spent about $ 10 million of his own money before losing in the August primary. Three Greenwich millionaires who largely self-financed their campaigns this year – Foley, Lamont, and Republican Linda McMahon in the U.S. Senate race – all lost.

Standing in the cavernous atrium of an office building Monday in downtown Hartford, Foley talked about the lawyers and accountants who studied the election results.

“I am both happy and disapointed with their report,” Foley said. ”They found no credible evidence of fraudulent voting. I am disappointed that the team reported a chaotic situation on election day and its aftermath in Bridgeport. … They also believe the number of votes by which the Bridgeport results are likely to be wrong would not, on its own, change the outcome of the race.”

“For me, the issue has always been: who won the race?” Foley said. “I frankly didn’t know the answer until just this morning.”

Voters “should have no doubt that Dan Malloy won the governor’s race,” Foley said.

“I’ll be congratulating him and wishing him the very best of luck running this state,” Foley said. “I wish him really good luck and hope he’s successful, because we really do have some serious problems. People all around this state are hurting and we owe them solutions.”

Foley said that his team had been looking for “evidence of fraud,” reporting errors and anomalies or anything that would affect the outcome of the race.

Foley thanked Lt. Gov. candidate Mark Boughton, his wife, Leslie, his campaign team, his supporters, and more than 500,000 who voted for him last week.

“Finally, I want to thank all of you in the press corps,” Foley told reporters. ”We have been fellow passengers on an interesting journey. I have enjoyed getting to know you and look forward to our continuing friendships. And without exception, I have found you serious, hard-working, and well-intended and only occasionally tempermental. You have treated me very fairly and covered this race well. I learned early on that it is a mistake not to take your questions after a press conference, so I am happy to answer any questions you may have now.”

Despite being questioned about the bankruptcy of The Bibb Company in Georgia, his two arrests that were later dismissed, and other issues, Foley never lost his cool in public during a long campaign. He was widely viewed to have handled his concession with class.

When asked if he would take a job in Malloy’s administration, Foley said that he would wait for any offer to be made before making any statements.

Foley said he believes the voting mess in Bridgeport should be looked into, not to try to change the election’s outcome, but to assure there’s no recurrence of it anywhere in the state. He said he’s satisfied that the problems in Bridgeport and elsewhere weren’t enough to change the outcome.

“I think what we learned over the weekend was sufficient for my making the decision that I had to make,” he said.  “But I do think that it’s probably a good idea to look into what happened in Bridgeport and make sure it doesn’t happen again.”

“We had an awful lot of people contact us saying  that they had seen things that they thought were irregular and might have been voter fraud – but, in chasing them down, none of them was significant and they certainly wouldn’t have affected enough votes to change the outcome of the governor’s race.”

Even while Foley was conceding the race, the state Republican Party has asked both federal and state officials to investigate the election results. Republicans have hired well-known attorney Ross Garber, who on Monday sent letters to the U.S. Attorney and the chief state’s attorney.

Capitol Watch

The Vanishing Southern, White Democrat

November 12, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

The Economist points out what we knew:  that white, Southern Democrats are a dying breed (at least in terms of seats in the Congress, if not as voters):  The long goodbye:  Is the white Southern Democrat extinct, endangered or just hibernating?

The dramatic nature of the decline is captured by the following graphic:

Of course, what this decline means is well encapsulated by the following:

This does not indicate a disappearance of liberals. White Southern Democrats were largely conservative before, and the Democratic domination of Congress in the second half of the 20th century rested on an uneasy coalition between men such as James Eastland, a senator from Mississippi who insisted three years after Brown v Board of Education banned segregation that “the vast majority of Negroes want their own schools, their own hospitals, their own churches, their own restaurants”, and northern urban liberals such as Ted Kennedy. Strom Thurmond, Richard Shelby and Phil Gramm—Southern Republican stalwarts all—were first elected as Democrats, and of the 37 Democrats who voted against the health-care bill in March, 16 were Southern whites.

Indeed, the dominance of the former Confederate states by the Democratic Party was a direct result of the Civil War and the Reconstruction Era, where Republicans such as Abraham Lincoln and the Radical Republicans who controlled the US Congress during Reconstruction made being a Republican in the South anathema.

Nevertheless, it is amazing to note how long it has taken for conservative southerners to shift to the GOP.  The 1994 elections was a watershed in that regard, but the filtering down beyond the state level has taken long.  For example, Alabama’s  state legislature only just went to Republican control as of this month’s elections.




Outside the Beltway

Top Democrat offers tongue-in-cheek kudos to new West aide

November 12, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Conservative talk show host Joyce Kaufman received some tongue-in-cheek congratulations from a top Democrat for her new job with U.S. Rep.-elect Alan West.

West, R-Plantation, hired Kaufman to be his chief of staff this week. West defeated incumbent Democrat Ron Klein in the Nov. 2 election to win the District 22 House seat representing the coastal area of Broward and Palm Beach counties.

Mitch Ceasar, the chairman of the Democratic Party in Broward, sent Kaufman a letter Wednesday on her “exciting new path.”

“I am sure you will remain the ‘reserved, un-opinionated, shy, former New Yorker’ that I have known,” Ceasar wrote. “So in the spirit of bipartisanship, bon voyage, and my your coat remain heavy and your gloves always remain at the ready – Brrr.”

Ceasar later said he found West’s choice of Kaufman unusual.

“He has the right to hire whoever he likes, but this is somewhat of an extreme choice,” Ceasar said. “This is a reaffirmation of the unusual times we live in where politics and show business merge.”




Broward Politics

Students can forget about using recall ballots to oust Liberal Democrat MPs

November 11, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

thetorydiary

28-Year Democrat Rep. Ortiz Loses, But Keeps ‘Finding’ Ballots in Recount

November 10, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

What we’re witnessing in the south Texas (TX-27 – Corpus Christi and Brownsville) Congressional recount that followed the race is a dramatic interpretation of the old Rocky and Bullwinkle magic act.

With 28-year just defeated Democrat incumbent Solomon Ortiz portraying Bullwinkle the Moose, and Republican Congressman-elect Blake Farenthold reprising Rocky the Squirrel.

Farenthold: “And now…”

Ortiz: “Hey Rocky, watch me pull a ballot out of my hat.”

Farenthold: “Again?”

On November 2, Farenthold beat Ortiz by 799 votes.  A tight race to be sure, but one that could be described as outside the margin of ACORN.  I mean error.

The fairly Leftist Corpus Christi Caller Times even said in a November 6 editorial “Honor the vote, which went for Farenthold.”

But Ortiz did not – and has not –acquiesced.  He demanded a recount.  And that’s when the “Out of Thin Air” show began.  Ortiz, Inc. keeps finding new bags containing new ballots – many with his name on them.

Ortiz, Inc. first found in Robstown – the epicenter of Ortiz, Inc. support – a bag with seven whole ballots in it.  All of them (shocking) cast for Ortiz.

*Poof*

That lowered Farenthold’s spread to 792.

Ortiz, Inc. then moved on to the provisional ballot and overseas vote portion of the program.  Which is a much tougher nut to crack.

Provisional ballots are usually cast if someone shows up to vote and is not on the books.  It could be a clerical error and he/she should be; it could be voter error – either he/she is at the wrong precinct or didn’t register to vote.  Regardless, in most cases the vast majority of these ballots are not properly cast and are therefore not counted.  An average of only about 10% make the final tally – the rest are people voting who should not have been voting.

Very Democrat Cameron County’s Election Administrator Roger Ortiz (we’re not sure if there’s any relation to the flailing soon-to-be ex-Congressman) said Monday that the number of provisional votes cast in his neck of the woods had magically increased from the 89 initially reported to 110.

*Poof*

In Nueces County – which Farenthold carried – there are 144 provisional ballots cast and 12 military/overseas ballots to be reviewed and counted, Nueces County Clerk Diana T. Barrera said.

But here’s the rub – there are in total in the entire district 735 remaining provisional and overseas votes cast by mail awaiting review and counting.  Ortiz, Inc. trails by 792 votes.

Which means if every single provisional vote is legitimate, and every single one of them AND the mail-in ballots are ALL cast for Ortiz – which would be David Copperfield-esque – HE STILL LOSES THE RACE.

Because no amount of magic makes 735 greater than 792.

So it would appear Ortiz, Inc. is either trying to drag this out long enough to conjure up enough additional votes to steal the election – or he is an entitlement lifer politician who is dragging out the very end of his very long 28-year Congressional run, unable to fathom that the people of south Texas chose… SOMEONE ELSE.  He is, after all, the only Congressman the district has ever had – it’s difficult for these sorts of people to let go.

November 2nd, we began showing these types of people the door.  Some, like Ortiz, will not go quietly into that great night.

Much like the numbers on ObamaCare and the alleged “stimulus,” Ortiz’s recount challenge doesn’t add up.  It’s time for him to hang it up – and make his public sector-self disappear.


Big Government

Republicans Pledge Bipartisanship With Democrat Dan Malloy, But They Have No Votes For Any Tax Increases

November 9, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

In a time of bipartisanship and congratulations in the post-election happiness for the winners, Republican legislators made calls for bipartisanship Tuesday with the newly elected Democratic governor, Dannel Malloy.

But the bipartisanship of November 9 might not be there when it comes time to vote on a state budget in late May or early June as the state tackles a projected $ 3.5 billion budget deficit for the next fiscal year.

When asked if Republicans will vote for any tax increases proposed by Malloy and the Democratic legislature, Senate GOP leader John McKinney said, “If the problem is $ 3.5 billion and there’s a $ 3 billion tax increase on the table, as there was in past budget proposals, the answer is there probably won’t be any Republican support for that.”

House GOP leader Larry Cafero had a similar response when asked how many lawmakers in his 51-member caucus would support a tax increase.

“If I had to guess right now, and it was put before us right now – none,” Cafero said.

Only hours after Republican Tom Foley conceded the race to Malloy, the House GOP caucus met with Malloy in an unplanned meeting Monday. The lawmakers vowed their cooperation, and McKinney said Malloy is welcome in the Senate caucus, too.

Malloy had just finished a press conference at the state Capitol on Monday when he heard that the House Republicans were holding their first caucus at the Legislative Office Building, which is connected to the Capitol by an underground tunnel. After being alerted by an aide that Malloy was outside the room, Cafero invited Malloy and Lt. Gov.-elect Nancy Wyman inside to greet the lawmakers.

“We pledged our good wishes, our support, our cooperation,” Cafero said. “It was a very nice, special moment for everybody.”

One of the most controversial issues at the Capitol in recent years has been paid sick leave – in which lawmakers have considered a law that would make Connecticut the first state in the nation to mandate paid sick leave for businesses. Malloy pledged his support for a new law during the campaign, and insiders say that the issue now has its best chance of passage ever.

“Obviously, by sheer numbers, it seems certainly hopeful for anyone who is in favor of it,” Cafero said of paid sick leave. “I think Senator McKinney and I, and our caucuses, stand firmly opposed to that and will continue to. Hopefully, we can engage the public in that debate and maybe change their minds.”

The Connecticut Business and Industry Association – the state’s largest business group – has lobbied heavily against the paid sick leave bill, which has never passed both chambers of the legislature in the same year.

Roy Occhiogrosso, the chief strategist during Malloy’s election campaign, said the unplanned meeting with the House Republicans came up when a lawmaker mentioned that there was a caucus going on at that very moment.

“Dan and Nancy went in, and they were warmly received,” Occhiogrosso said Tuesday. “He said, ‘l know that we won’t always agree,’ and people in the room laughed. He said you will receive nothing but respect from my staff and me.”

He added, “Dan and Nancy, when they were in the caucus, were clear that they want to work together. You can disagree without being disagreeable.”

Occhiogrosso said the new administration is seeking common ground with the Republicans as the state faces a massive budget deficit.

“I think there is a general sense that Dan and Nancy have that the problems are so severe that the old way of doing politics just isn’t going to work,” Occhiogrosso said. “Dan and Nancy are committed to working with whoever wants to work with them. … I think they hope to find common ground more often than not.”

Occhiogrosso said it is understandable that the Republicans might not agree on all issues, such as taxes and paid sick leave. But he noted that the Republicans – like Malloy – want to change the state’s financial procedures and switch to a system that uses generally accepted accounting principles, known as GAAP.

“Nancy has been talking about this for years in Hartford at the Capitol,” Occhiogrosso said, adding that Malloy – like other mayors – kept the books on the municipal level according to GAAP accounting.

Capitol Watch

Eight States Will Send Just One Democrat to Congress

November 9, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Roll Call reports that eight states will each send just a single Democrat to Congress next session, and many of them face difficult re-election bids in 2012.

Among those vulnerable in the Senate: Sens. Ben Nelson (D-NE) and Kent Conrad (D-ND).
Taegan Goddard’s Political Wire

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