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From JPost:

An explosion took place on or near a bus in central Jerusalem Wednesday afternoon.

Police said that a bomb exploded outside Egged bus number 74 at a station in front of the Jerusalem Conference Center in the center of town.

Reports said that over 30 people were injured in the attack although the exact number was still unknown.

Magen David Adom said that no deaths were reported in the attack.

Police suspected that an explosive device inside a bag was left at the bus stop, which then exploded.

A source tells me that one person was killed, but this is not official by any means.

So far I cannot find anyone claiming credit for the explosion.

Israel Matzav and The Muqata are liveblogging.

The Muqata has unconfirmed reports of 3 fatalities.

There was also a possible murder of an Israeli in Revava.



Elder of Ziyon

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From JPost:

An explosion took place on or near a bus in central Jerusalem Wednesday afternoon.

Police said that a bomb exploded outside Egged bus number 74 at a station in front of the Jerusalem Conference Center in the center of town.

Reports said that over 30 people were injured in the attack although the exact number was still unknown.

Magen David Adom said that no deaths were reported in the attack.

Police suspected that an explosive device inside a bag was left at the bus stop, which then exploded.

A source tells me that one person was killed, but this is not official by any means.

So far I cannot find anyone claiming credit for the explosion.

Israel Matzav and The Muqata are liveblogging.

The Muqata has unconfirmed reports of 3 fatalities.

There was also a possible murder of an Israeli in Revava.



Elder of Ziyon

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Transcript of Phone Interview with Sergeant Edi (Edward) Itelman

Edi: I’m a paramedic in the army. My base is located 10 minutes from Itamar. So, Friday night, approx. 1:00 AM, I get a call that there has been a terrorist penetration in Itamar and I should come there because there are wounded. There’s a special code in the army, it was used and it meant someone’s in the village in Itamar and there’s a terrorist attack right this moment. So I take my crew, me, another medic and our driver, and we take the ambulance to Itamar. When we reached the house, we were careful, of course, because we weren’t sure whether the terrorists were still in the house or not. There could be a situation. So we entered the house carefully – gun first and all that – and we made sure no one is there, and then we tended to the wounded. At the far end of the first room I see a frail little child lying on the carpet with three stab wounds in his chest. I leave my medic there to attend to him, because I thought he was still alive. Later we realized he was not. So I left the medic there; he was the first one we saw. Second room, a child about 4 years of age lying on his bed – butchered is the best way to describe it. I guess you saw the pictures. A very grotesque, very unpleasant sight. The whole floor was blood. I go into the third room and I see the mother lying on the floor in her own blood with multiple stab wounds. She seemed dead on sight. I checked for bleeding, but nothing. On the bed in the same room there’s the father. Again – dead on sight, no bleeding. Single stab wound near his neck. The third, the baby, she was found kind of underneath the father. At first I saw it and didn’t realize what it was. Kind of wrapped up in a blanket but it didn’t look like one. I turned her over and realized it was a baby.

Q: Was the father trying to protect the baby?

A: Seemed like the baby was behind the father. She was dead with one stab wound to her skull. So these are the five patients I saw. I come back to the first room and the first boy, when I tried to help him I saw he was dead as well. Carpet was full of blood; there was no movement or breathing. I reported back, said there were five casualties and there was nothing we could do for them, they were butchered.

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about what that was like for you, in personal terms?

A: It was different in professional and personal terms. In professional terms, it was very upsetting and frustrating that as a paramedic, I help so many people, but there’s nothing I can do for an entire family who are right before my eyes. On personal terms… the first thought that came to mind is that I have a little sister, not much older – she’s five – it was kind of hard for me. You know, I’ve seen terrorist attacks and bombings and all sorts of things. But it’s different. When you have a suicide bombing, you blow up next to a dozen people, there’s nothing personal about it. But stabbing three kids to death is very personal. And the people who did it, they have ideologies and stuff, I get that. But to stab three children to death – it’s incomprehensible. You can’t understand it, how someone could do something like that. That’s the thing that bothered me most. How can you—? When you hold a little child, it doesn’t matter who he is. And they didn’t stab to injure, they stabbed with mass brutality – again and again and again until they were dead.

Q: Sorry for asking such a dispassionate question, but do you have any idea how much time it would take – if they could have responded earlier?

A: I’ll tell you what. The murder probably occurred – first thing, are you asking how the murder was discovered? Itamar, being a religious settlement, Friday night is a bad time. They were dead approximately half an hour before I arrived there; about seven minutes before they were discovered. I don’t think there’s anything we could have done. The easiest solution is to close up all the Palestinian villages and say ‘no, you’re not going out’ – but we can’t do that, because we’re humanitarian. Me, as a paramedic, I mean this is why I chose to become one in the IDF – because we’re humanitarian. So this is my opinion. We couldn’t do anything for these people.

Q: To what degree is it difficult for you, after being present at such a carnage scene caused by a Palestinian, to treat Palestinians?

A: The next time I had to treat Palestinians was a day after that. And you know who I got to treat? One of the people they captured as a suspect for the attack. He was maybe part of the plan, something like that. But the only thing you can do is be as detached and professional as you can be. You don’t think about what he might do in the future or what he did in the past. Because if you do that you’re in the wrong business. And I treated him and he survived.

Q: Have you been in contact with any of the relatives to the murdered family?

A: My medic, the guy who was with me, wanted to go to the funeral. We thought it would be in Itamar. Eventually it was in Jerusalem and we couldn’t leave the area since we’re stationed here. The next day we came over with the ambulance to see the house – part of a routine tour. We saw some people there and people came and talked to us. It’s such a small place; a settlement with no more than 100-200 people. Everybody knows everybody. I know people there. We talked to them, it was difficult but we did.

Q: Can you tell us about other experiences you’ve had as a paramedic?

A: I tell you what, my job, as a paramedic, is the best I could have chosen. I believe, and I’m sorry because now I’m giving you all my ideology, but I believe we’re a very humanitarian army, because when we have a severely injured Palestinian citizen or even a terrorist, I will treat them the best I can and I get full backing. If I need a helicopter I’ll get one, and if I need a trauma surgeon I’ll get one. The only thing you focus on is the job, on saving lives. You don’t concentrate on who you’ll save, only how.

Q: Did you have any events when you had to take care of Palestinians?

A: A few weeks ago there was a major car accident – simply a car accident between two vehicles, both cars with Palestinians inside. We came there and started doing our job. Eventually – remember I told you I can get all the backup when I need it? – I decided the patient needed a helicopter now, and I got it 10 minutes later, which is the soonest I could physically get it. The patient went to Beilinson Hospital and recovered. We treat them all, guys. The West Bank – you have Israeli and Palestinian people. We believe that each and every one of them deserves the same standard of care. This is what we give to everyone. No matter if it’s an Israeli, Palestinian, or a foreign citizen. We give the same care to everyone.

UPDATE: DG writes:

This:

A: The next time I had to treat Palestinians was a day after that. And you know who I got to treat? One of the people they captured as a suspect for the attack. He was maybe part of the plan, something like that. But the only thing you can do is be as detached and professional as you can be. You don’t think about what he might do in the future or what he did in the past. Because if you do that you’re in the wrong business. And I treated him and he survived.

reminded me of Dr. David Zangen’s story in Jenin:

“I am infuriated by the claims of a massacre in Jenin, for another reason. The paramedics and I risked our lives to treat the wounded Palestinians. As well as the wounded, we also treated the sick. The Palestinian doctors did not come to their aid, and we could not leave them without medical treatment. The Palestinian doctors were unable to reach a girl who had an attack of appendicitis. The soldiers brought the girl over to us and we treated her. In another case, a youngster came to us with a neck wound. We saved his life, in spite of his Islamic Jihad tattoo. We tried to provide full treatment for every Palestinian, and I am proud of it. I am in no doubt: the Americans would not have taken such risks, and would have acted differently. We acted in this way, simply to avoid civilian casualties.”

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Daled Amos

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UPDATE: 12:20 ET

France has officially confirmed that its military are engaged around and over Libya.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy said in Paris, “Our air force will oppose any aggression by Colonel Gadhafi against the population of Benghazi…As of now, our aircraft are preventing planes from attacking the town…As of now, our aircraft are prepared to intervene against tanks.”

Read More Here

===

UPDATE: 11:11 ET, March 19, 2011

The BBC reports, “French military jets over Libya”:

French military jets are preventing forces loyal to Libyan leader Col Muammar Gaddafi from attacking the rebel-held city of Benghazi, French President Nicolas Sarkozy says.

It is believed to be the first act of intervention since the UN voted on Thursday for a no-fly zone over Libya.

::

French aircraft have also flown over “all Libyan territory” on reconnaissance missions, French military sources said earlier.

The French Rafale jets took off from their base at Saint-Dizier in eastern France, a source told the Agence France-Presse news agency.

“French reconnaissance jets are clearly scoping out targets in Libya. I would assume there have been special forces on the ground as well, assessing potential targets,” says BBC Defense correspondent, Caroline Wyatt.

Also,

The planes encountered no problems during the first few hours of their mission, the source said, and the flights would continue for the next several hours.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte told journalists at the summit in Paris that he believed British, French and Canadian aircraft would launch the first airstrikes, the BBC’s Carole Walker in Paris reports.

Asked if those strikes would take place later on Saturday, Mr Rutte said that was a possibility…

Read More Here

====

Original Post:

As Moammar Gaddafi fragrantly violates the terms of the UN Security Council resolution and his own “cease-fire” declaration by attacking the eastern rebel stronghold of Benghazi, those countries taking part in the coalition must now decide exactly what military actions will be taken, when and who will lead the mission—among other questions.

And it won’t be a moment too soon as Libyan Government troops “in tanks and trucks entered Benghazi from the west, in the university area, and began to shell the city, including civilian areas. Intense fighting broke out in some enclaves. The city of 1 million quickly became a ghost town, with residents fleeing or seeking cover in barricaded neighborhoods,” according to the Washington Post.

Also according to the Post,

U.S. ships in the Mediterranean were preparing to bombard Libya’s air defenses and runways to clear the way for European and Arab forces to establish a no-fly zone throughout the country, according to U.S. and European officials. Fighter aircraft from France, Britain and the United Arab Emirates converged on bases in and around Italy to begin operations over Libya under the command and control of the United States at its naval base in Naples.

More specifically, Britain has already started preparations to deploy Tornados and Typhoon aircraft, as well as air-to-air refueling and surveillance aircraft.

But, according to the BBC, “It is not yet clear who the commander of the operation will be, where it will be headquartered and what [NATO] assets might be used.”

And:

The fact that the British Prime Minister is going to France on Saturday could be an indication that, having taken the diplomatic lead on recognising the rebels, France is also keen to take a military lead.

The British Prime Minister told Parliament on Friday that Britain was getting ready to move the designated aircraft “in the coming hours” to airbases from where they could start to take the necessary action.

The BBC report provides details on the aircraft and equipments to be used, types of missions they may be engaged in, possible locations from where the missions would be launched and potential targets.

Finally, the article discusses how the Libyan crisis “could call more of the strategic defence and security review’s conclusions into question, and perhaps even prompt a fresh look at the UK’s military assets” and how “a government wishing to take a leading role on the world stage can afford to lose yet more military capability and personnel at a time when world events are proving more unpredictable than ever.”

Read More Here

Image: Courtesy BBC


The Moderate Voice

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Seattle Post Intelligencer
Live blog: Stay updated on Friday's NCAA tournament action
USA Today (blog)
After a scintillating day of action Thursday, the NCAA tournament takes the court again today with 16 more games that will complete the second round and get us ready for the weekend. And once again, USA TODAY is at the ready as Erick Smith and Tim
Follow the NCAAs live on Friday: Michigan-TennesseeSalt Lake Tribune
NCAA Tournament: Oakland University vs. TexasChristian Science Monitor
Scouting the madness: TexasFS Southwest
Beaumont Enterprise -News10.net -KTUL
all 507 news articles »

Sports - Google News

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Seattle Post Intelligencer
Live blog: Stay updated on Friday's NCAA tournament action
USA Today (blog)
After a scintillating day of action Thursday, the NCAA tournament takes the court again today with 16 more games that will complete the second round and get us ready for the weekend. And once again, USA TODAY is at the ready as Erick Smith and Tim
Follow the NCAAs live on Friday: Michigan-TennesseeSalt Lake Tribune
NCAA Tournament: Oakland University vs. TexasChristian Science Monitor
Scouting the madness: TexasFS Southwest
Beaumont Enterprise -News10.net -KTUL
all 507 news articles »

Sports - Google News

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The Muqata has a summary of a Special IDF press conference for bloggers just half an hour ago that the IDF intercepted the Victoria bound from Gaza to Syria and found weapons originating from Iran.

According to Muqata’s summary:

Early this morning IDF Naval Commandos from boarded a cargo ship, “Victoria” — a German owned ship, operating by a French Company, flying under a Liberian flag. We had advance intelligence information that this vessel was carrying weapons.

We boarded the ship and the crew complied without any violence. A preliminary search revealed weapons in shipping containers. The Israeli navy is now escorting the boat to Israel where a further, detailed examination of the cargo and the ship will take place.

The ship originated from the Syrian port of Latkia, and also docked in Turkey’s Mersin Port on its way to Alexandria in Egypt. The IDF believes the weapons found on board were destined for Hamas in Gaza.

The ship’s crew apparently had no idea there were weapons in the shipping containers, and the IDF doesn’t believe that Egypt or Turkey were connected.

The current operating analysis is that Syria and Iran are the major actors, cooperating to send weapons to Hamas.

It has not yet been revealed what kinds of weapons were found on the ship.

Israel Matzav was at the conference also, and suggests a possible connection between the weapons and the Iranian ships that recently passed through the Suez Canal:

Lt. Col. Leibovich did not know whether the weapons were connected to the Iranian warships that passed through the Suez Canal three weeks ago. But given that those ships sailed to Latakia - and then went right back through the Canal - this is a distinct possibility.

More details will be forthcoming.

Anyone who recalls the incident of the Karin A, knows that this is not the first attempt to smuggle weapons to terrorists. In addition to the Karine A, there have been a number of previous instances-including incidents involving the Santorini, Abu Hassan, the Hansa India, the Monchegorsk, the Francop and Everest cargo vessels. These were involved in what were otherwise innocent transnational commercial shipping which was abused by States that sponsor terrorism, including Iran, Syria and Lebanon, all done in order to facilitate the illegal trafficking of arms to terrorist organizations in the region. Check out: Israel’s interception of arms ships - Background

If nothing else, today’s incident demonstrates the necessity for Israel’s legal blockade of Gaza, to prevent weapons being delivered to the Hamas terrorist group.

UPDATE: Here are some photos of what the IDF found aboard the Victoria:

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Daled Amos

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The participation of former Bulldogs David Pollack (L) and Randall Godfrey (at lectern) in Ray Drew's commitment announcement was a violation of NCAA rules. (AJC photo by Chip Towers)

The participation of former Bulldogs David Pollack (L) and Randall Godfrey (at lectern) in Ray Drew's Jan. 28 commitment announcement was a violation of several NCAA rules. (AJC photo by Chip Towers)

(Adds comments from David Pollack, 2:20 p.m.)

Ray Drew’s decision to have former Georgia football stars Randall Godfrey and David Pollack speak at his commitment ceremony in January has the Bulldogs in some hot water with the Southeastern Conference.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has learned that UGA had to report five NCAA rules violations to the SEC as a result of Drew’s Jan. 28 news conference at Thomas County Central High School. Drew, a five-star recruiting prospect, announced that day he was committing to the Bulldogs.  The 6-foot-5, 250-pound defensive end has since signed a national letter-of-intent with UGA.

Georgia Athletic Director Greg McGarity detailed the violations in a March 4 letter sent to SEC Commissioner Mike Slive. That letter was obtained by the AJC …

AJC College Sports Recruiting

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I have seen the future of the sunshine state … and it is Alabama-Mississippi, with a side of Kentucky. May God and his pet dinosaur have mercy on us all … From a dispatch by the League of Women Voters today: TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Immediately following today’s Cabinet meeting, the Executive Clemency Board will vote [...]
The Reid Report

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http://www.examiner.com/political-buzz-i…

On The Diane Rhem Show they just stated a “state senator” had been tackled, and that would have meant game over. But, just a rep.

Bad enough, of course.

Unhappily, her panel of nationally known reporters are discussing it as a “senator.” Diane! Double check these things!

Video at the link.

Recent quick hits

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The Army private accused of sharing classified information with Wikileaks is facing a raft of new charges, upping the government’s ante in the case. Is this where the government’s focus shifts away from prosecuting Julian Assange, and squarely onto Bradley Manning? From Politico: The military announced Wednesday that it has filed 22 additional charges against [...]
The Reid Report

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(Scott)

louiszamperini.jpg

This past November Wall Street Journal Saturday Review section carried Steve Oney’s moving joint profile of Laura Hillenbrand and Louis Zamperini, the subject of Hillenbrand’s book Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption. Zamperini competed in the 1936 Berlin Olympics and then served in the Army Air Corps during the war. David Margolick concisely summarized what happened next:

In late May 1943, the B-24 carrying the 26-year-old Zamperini went down over the Pacific. For nearly seven weeks — longer, Hillenbrand believes, than any other such instance in recorded history — Zamperini and his pilot managed to survive on a fragile raft. They traveled 2,000 miles, only to land in a series of Japanese prison camps, where, for the next two years, Zamperini underwent a whole new set of tortures. His is one of the most spectacular odysseys of this or any other war, and “odyssey” is the right word, for with its tempests and furies and monsters, many of them human, Zamperini’s saga is something out of Greek mythology.

Margolick commented on the “new set of tortures” Zamperini endured:

That story encompasses an aspect of the American experience during World War II — the cruelty of the Japanese — that, in an era of Toyotas…and Hideki Matsui, has been almost entirely forgotten. (Forgotten in the United States, that is: Japanese sensitivities on the subject remain sufficiently high that Hillenbrand refuses to identify her translators there.) It’s also yet another testament to the courage and ingenuity of America’s Greatest Generation, along with its wonderful, irrepressible American-style irreverence: just hearing the nicknames — many unprintable here — that the P.O.W.’s bestowed on their guards makes you fall in love with these soldiers.

Reading Janet Maslin’s review New York Times review of the book, I was incredulous not even to have heard of Zamperini previously. But, as Oney and Journal reviewer James Hornfischer point out, Hillenbrand hadn’t heard of him either before she undertook the research for Seabiscuit.

Zamperini lives; he just turned 94. Struggling with the effects of chronic fatigue syndrome, Hillenbrand has only interviewed him from a distance. They have never met, yet they have formed a deep bond that Oney described:

Over the course of the seven years Ms. Hillenbrand toiled on “Unbroken,” she and Mr. Zamperini became friends, despite never laying eyes on each other. “I call him a virtuoso of joy,” she says. “When things are going bad, I phone him.” Says Mr. Zamperini, “Every time I say good-bye to her, I tell her I love her and she tells me, ‘I love you.’ I’ve never known a girl like her.

“Laura brought my war buddies back to life,” he says. “The fact that Laura has suffered so much enabled her to put our suffering into words.”

Zamperini’s story should be common knowledge, especially while we can still express our gratitude to him for his sacrifice. Hillenbrand may have done the job; her book has been sitting on top of the Times’s nonfiction list for the past several weeks.

Our friend Hugh Hewitt had the privilege of interviewing Zamperini along with Zamperini’s fellow Olympic athlete and USC alum John Naber in the studio this week. The audio of the interview is posted here. I learned from Hugh’s interview that Zamperini has a Web site here with items of interest including Bob Simon’s 1998 rendition of Zamperini’s story (under the “video clip” tag on the menu at the top).




Power Line

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(Scott)

louiszamperini.jpg

This past November Wall Street Journal Saturday Review section carried Steve Oney’s moving joint profile of Laura Hillenbrand and Louis Zamperini, the subject of Hillenbrand’s book Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption. Zamperini competed in the 1936 Berlin Olympics and then served in the Army Air Corps during the war. David Margolick concisely summarized what happened next:

In late May 1943, the B-24 carrying the 26-year-old Zamperini went down over the Pacific. For nearly seven weeks — longer, Hillenbrand believes, than any other such instance in recorded history — Zamperini and his pilot managed to survive on a fragile raft. They traveled 2,000 miles, only to land in a series of Japanese prison camps, where, for the next two years, Zamperini underwent a whole new set of tortures. His is one of the most spectacular odysseys of this or any other war, and “odyssey” is the right word, for with its tempests and furies and monsters, many of them human, Zamperini’s saga is something out of Greek mythology.

Margolick commented on the “new set of tortures” Zamperini endured:

That story encompasses an aspect of the American experience during World War II — the cruelty of the Japanese — that, in an era of Toyotas…and Hideki Matsui, has been almost entirely forgotten. (Forgotten in the United States, that is: Japanese sensitivities on the subject remain sufficiently high that Hillenbrand refuses to identify her translators there.) It’s also yet another testament to the courage and ingenuity of America’s Greatest Generation, along with its wonderful, irrepressible American-style irreverence: just hearing the nicknames — many unprintable here — that the P.O.W.’s bestowed on their guards makes you fall in love with these soldiers.

Reading Janet Maslin’s review New York Times review of the book, I was incredulous not even to have heard of Zamperini previously. But, as Oney and Journal reviewer James Hornfischer point out, Hillenbrand hadn’t heard of him either before she undertook the research for Seabiscuit.

Zamperini lives; he just turned 94. Struggling with the effects of chronic fatigue syndrome, Hillenbrand has only interviewed him from a distance. They have never met, yet they have formed a deep bond that Oney described:

Over the course of the seven years Ms. Hillenbrand toiled on “Unbroken,” she and Mr. Zamperini became friends, despite never laying eyes on each other. “I call him a virtuoso of joy,” she says. “When things are going bad, I phone him.” Says Mr. Zamperini, “Every time I say good-bye to her, I tell her I love her and she tells me, ‘I love you.’ I’ve never known a girl like her.

“Laura brought my war buddies back to life,” he says. “The fact that Laura has suffered so much enabled her to put our suffering into words.”

Zamperini’s story should be common knowledge, especially while we can still express our gratitude to him for his sacrifice. Hillenbrand may have done the job; her book has been sitting on top of the Times’s nonfiction list for the past several weeks.

Our friend Hugh Hewitt had the privilege of interviewing Zamperini along with Zamperini’s fellow Olympic athlete and USC alum John Naber in the studio this week. The audio of the interview is posted here. I learned from Hugh’s interview that Zamperini has a Web site here with items of interest including Bob Simon’s 1998 rendition of Zamperini’s story (under the “video clip” tag on the menu at the top).




Power Line

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The world’s leading expert on frivolous impeachments of the President of the United States is calling on the current crop of GOP lawmakers to repeat the same mistake he made as Speaker:

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who plans within two weeks to announce if he will run for president, said today that if President Obama doesn’t change his mind and order his Justice Department to enforce the Defense of Marriage Act, Republicans in Congress should strike back and even consider impeachment proceedings.

“I believe the House Republicans next week should pass a resolution instructing the president to enforce the law and to obey his own constitutional oath, and they should say if he fails to do so that they will zero out [defund] the office of attorney general and take other steps as necessary until the president agrees to do his job,” said Gingrich. “His job is to enforce the rule of law and for us to start replacing the rule of law with the rule of Obama is a very dangerous precedent.”

Watch it:

It’s difficult to count the problems with Gingrich’s proposal. For starters, Holder’s letter announcing that DOJ will not defend DOMA in court specifically states that DOMA will “continue to be enforced by the Executive Branch.” The only effect of Holder’s announcement is that the Department of Justice will no longer submit legal briefs supporting an unconstitutional injustice in court.

More importantly, if the House does take Gingrich up on his suggestion, it will also need to impeach conservative Chief Justice John Roberts. In 1990, then-acting Solicitor General Roberts refused to defend a federal affirmative action law after he successfully convinced the George H.W. Bush Administration that the law was unconstitutional (he failed to convince the Supreme Court, however. The law was upheld). By declining to defend DOMA, the Obama Administration is following the exact same approach embraced by Roberts.

Gingrich’s plan to defund Attorney General Holder in retaliation for Holder’s invocation of the Roberts Rule is equally absurd. The Attorney General oversees thousands of federal prosecutors, law enforcement officers and anti-terrorism officials. All of these essential personnel would be handicapped if the Justice Department were suddenly decapitated to serve Gingrich’s petty vendetta.

Moreover, Gingrich’s grandstanding on the defense of marriage is a bit ironic.

ThinkProgress

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Another bombshell report from Rolling Stone, which has learned that an American military team tasked with conducting psychological operations or “Psy-Ops” in Afghanistan was ordered by superiors to illegally target US lawmakers. The goal: to get more troops and more funding for the Afghan war. From the Rolling Stone bombshell report: The orders came from [...]
The Reid Report

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