WikiLeaks: The Assault on ‘Big Brother’ Begins (El Pais, Spain)

December 5, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comments Off 

As I have pointed out over recent days, one of the most riveting aspects of the disclosure of classified U.S. diplomatic cables is that because they touch upon local issues and local leaders around the world, there are fascinating nuances of reaction from country to country.

Below are three articles we’ve translated from Spain’s El Pais, one of the five newspapers in the consortium selected by WikiLeaks to interpret the U.S. diplomatic cables for the world.

In the first article, headlined WikiLeaks: The Assault on ‘Big Brother’ Begins, columnist Liuis Bassets forecasts that America may be the first global power to feel the pain, but countries like China, ‘where audiovisual and cybernetic hyper-control of citizens is combined with military and police controls,’ are undoubtedly next.

What a blow little David WikiLeaks has issued to the forehead of Big Brother - who knows and controls everything! It’s understood that the U.S. government has tried to minimize the damage.

The international credibility and prestige that the U.S. had recovered thanks to Obama - and that was some of the most precious political capital of his presidency - is slipping away in full view of everyone, via the open channel of WikiLeaks.

But Big Brother, constantly on the advance in the U.S and Europe, has analogues elsewhere that are much worse and more faithful to the totalitarian Cold War model inspired by George Orwell, creator of the literary character. We refer to countries like China, where audiovisual and cybernetic hyper-control of citizens is combined with military and police controls that are the tradition for dictatorships. That such a leak hasn’t reached this even-more sinister and totalitarian version of Big Brother is not to discredit the revelations about the U.S. Nor does it mean that such disclosures won’t someday reach China. Technology and globalization will contribute to this, and hopefully soon. So will, no doubt, new powers - or emerging non-state counter-powers that arise out of global and technological civil society, of which WikiLeaks is only the first and most spectacular example.

The second article from Spain, by columnist Jan Martínez Ahrens, headlined U.S. Cables Expose Nuance of Displeasure with Spanish Government, discusses what the WikiLeaks disclosure and the American interpretations of Spain that they reveal can tell Spaniards about their political leaders and Spain’s standing in the eyes of America.

The primary object of the U.S. Embassy’s work is the socialist government. The picture painted by the three U.S. ambassadors over the past six years (billionaire George L. Argyros, Cuban-American Eduardo Aguirre and, for Obama Administration, philanthropist Alan D. Solomont) in their numerous secret missives to Washington - often with a copy to the CIA - outline the ups and downs of the relationship with Zapatero and his team. The picture exposes Spanish politics at the highest levels and presents an unprecedented inside look at American interests in Spain, which are often quite different from those of Spaniards.

In a report prepared by Ambassador Eduardo Aguirre and sent to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, it is stated that, “Zapatero is playing a game for the benefit of his leftist and pacifist electoral base, and uses foreign policy to score points in Spanish politics, rather than to address to key priorities of foreign policy or broader strategic objectives (…) This has led to a bilateral relationship that is zig-zagging erratically.”

This one-sided balance of power is reflected in the treatment dispensed to Spanish politicians. Not one of them is met with enthusiasm, except for the King (there is even advice on how to make oneself agreeable to him), and perhaps the military. Much more unfavorable is the description of the prime minister. From the beginning of his term, he is considered a problem for certain major aspects of U.S. foreign policy. He is defined as a short-term politician who puts electoral calculation ahead of the common interests of the nation.

Finally, in an article headlined Thanks to WikiLeaks’ Disclosure, Classical Diplomacy is Dead, columnist Jose Ignacio Torreblanca writes that the way diplomats work - and even their job descriptions, may never be the same:

Delving into the power struggles within a government, knowing who really commands or has influence, getting a sense of elite opinion, guessing what their real priorities are and their possibilities of success, all require talking to lots of people, here and there, to compose a picture that has some value. In this way, diplomats are like journalists and telegrams are like news items - only more sensitive. But with the difference that up to now, the rules of the game didn’t exist.

Now, with subjects knowing that their comments and opinions can be literally attributed to the source, and that embassies cannot preserve or protect their identities, diplomats will find a huge vacuum around them when they want to set aside their ceremonial and representational roles and get into matters of substance. After the disclosure by WikiLeaks, embassies will have to change the way they work if they want to survive. Most likely, WikiLeaks has hammered the final nail in the coffin of classical diplomacy.

READ ON AT WORLDMEETS.US, your most trusted translator and aggregator of foreign news and views about our nation. Log on for continuous global reaction to the leak of U.S. diplomatic cables. Coming up tomorrow, more Saudi Arabian and French reaction.


The Moderate Voice

Thailand-based jihadist group at heart of raids in Spain also had airport rubber stamps, relied partly on pickpockets

December 4, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comments Off 

More on this story. “Spain Deepens Probe Into European Jihadist Passport Network,” by David Roman for Dow Jones Newswires, December 3:

MADRID (Dow Jones) Spanish and Thai police have discovered a trove of documents including Chinese and European visas, as well as airport rubber stamps, amid a deepening probe into a Thailand-based Jihadist group, Spain’s interior ministry said Friday.

Investigations shed new light on ties between terror groups and petty crime, with evidence showing that an Islamist cell in Thailand supplied doctored passports and other documents to organizations like al Qaida, Pakistan’s Lashkar e Taiba and Sri Lanka’s Tamil Tigers, but also to groups involved in human trafficking and illegal arms trading.

The passports were stolen in several locations across Europe, the Spanish ministry said. In particular, one cell comprising six Pakistanis and one Nigerian-all detained earlier this week -stole passports from tourists in the Barcelona area, which it later sent to Thailand.

According to a report in Spanish newspaper El Pais, the Barcelona cell relied on pickpockets, who were paid for stolen passports. These passports, from specific nationalities and age brackets, were selected following criteria set by the group’s alleged head in Thailand, a Pakistani citizen identified by Spanish police as Muhammad Athar Butt.

One of those passports was carried by one of the Lashkar e Taiba terrorists who carried out the 2008 Mumbai attacks, killing 175, El Pais said. That discovery triggered the current probe, the newspaper added.

Athar Butt and two accomplices were in posession of doctored passports from Canada and Italy when they were detained in Bangkok earlier this week, Spain’s Interior ministry said, as well as sophisticated equipment used for forgeries. Thai police has also discovered large amounts of documents and files belonging to the group, that are current being studied.

Jihad Watch

Spain dismantles jihadist passport theft ring

December 1, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Your stolen passport may be a jihadi’s ticket into a Western country. “Spain Dismantles Passport Ring For Islamic Cells Abroad,” by David Roman for Dow Jones Newswires, December 1 (thanks to Twostellas):

MADRID -(Dow Jones)- Spanish police arrested seven men in Barcelona, suspected of stealing passports for radical Islamic cells in Thailand and Pakistan, and collaborating with the group that carried out the 2008 attacks in Mumbai, the country’s Interior ministry said Wednesday.

The suspects, six Pakistanis and one Nigerian, are believed to be part of a European network that allegedly obtained passports to be forged in Thailand. The passports were later distributed to cells including Al Qaeda, Pakistan’s Lashkar e Taiba-which carried out the Mumbai attacks, killing 175-and Sri Lanka’s Tamil Tigers, the ministry said in a statement….

According to Spanish police, the group allegedly stole large amounts of foreign passports from tourists in Spain-practically all in or around Barcelona-over the 18-month period during which the group was under surveillance. The thefts were allegedly requested by the Thailand-based head of the group, who asked for passports with specific nationalities and age brackets.

Jihad Watch

Spain and Bank Runs

November 29, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Paul Krugman explains why Spain likely neither will nor should leave the Euro:

Should Spain try to break out of this trap by leaving the euro, and re-establishing its own currency? Will it? The answer to both questions is, probably not. Spain would be better off now if it had never adopted the euro — but trying to leave would create a huge banking crisis, as depositors raced to move their money elsewhere. Unless there’s a catastrophic bank crisis anyway — which seems plausible for Greece and increasingly possible in Ireland, but unlikely though not impossible for Spain — it’s hard to see any Spanish government taking the risk of “de-euroizing.”

I suppose one issue is this: Having read this column, if I had a Spanish bank account I’d now be looking for feasible ways to minimize the amount of funds in it. And once everyone starts hedging against a bank run, your bank run is under way.

The larger question posed here is whether it really makes sense to be running separate national banking systems parallel to a single continent-wide monetary authority. A regulatory system that works fine until there’s a problem doesn’t really work at all.


Yglesias

Spain Learns That Solar Really, Really Needs Government Handouts

November 26, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Apparently, without government money, solar power might not even be able to power its own life support

The Spanish government has launched a new regulatory framework that will result in subsidized tariffs for ground-mounted solar energy projects drop 45% this year, killing future investment in the trade, which industry leaders expect will be frozen in the next few years.

“We expect new ground-mounted projects will be paralyzed because there won’t be any new investments,” says Tomas Diaz, communications director of a trade lobby Asociación de la Industria Fotovoltaica (ASIF). “Last year, many projects were cancelled. Banks did not provide financing because of the regulatory uncertainty and electricity companies’ growing campaign against the sector,” he said, adding that utilities are working to bolster subsidies for their own renewable projects, most of which involve wind power.

All the funky language in the article boils down to

Spain has needed to curb spending as it was hit with one of the biggest recessions ever to rock the country in its long history. The government wants to cut renewable subsidies, which reportedly cost public coffers €6.2bn last year. Of this, €3bn went to the solar power industry, which meets just 2% of Spain’s power needs, according to government representatives. Moreover, there are claims that the industry has engaged in “fraudulent” management of state subsidies, which it disputes.

Without government money to prop the industry up, private investors and companies are starting to bail. Now, don’t get me wrong, I personally support the use of solar, among other alternative methods I support, yet, apparently, without massive amounts of government expenditure, it can barely survive. 75,000 “green jobs” have been lost in the solar sector. So, what to do?

The industry is so frustrated that it has sued Spain’s government, arguing that that new regulation is way too harsh and even “unconstitutional” as the tariff cuts are expected to apply to both new and existing projects, meaning the industry may have to make retroactive payments.

Suing because the government is not giving money they don’t have. Anyone doubt that the USA is on the same path?

Crossed at Pirate’s Cove. Follow me on Twitter @WilliamTeach. sit back and Relax. we’ll dRive!

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Stop The ACLU

De-Euroizing Spain

November 25, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Corcoran310 tweets “I really think u should do what u can to get Spain to ditch the euro. a weak Spanish currency would be awesome, I love madrid.”

I love Madrid, too. Barcelona is of course excellent but everyone knows that. Madrid is both excellent and underrated. And with currency devaluation, it could be cheap as well. But how to get there? The simplest resolution is to go rogue—quit the Euro, in effect default on debts, suffer the bank runs, and then when the economy’s moving assume it’ll be possible to work some stuff out.

Another path would be this. The Spanish government has two kinds of accounts payable. One is interest and principle on bonds it’s issued in international capital markets. The other is things like salaries, pensions, and transfer payments. Right now, all of this is denominated in Euros. Spain could take its Category 2 obligations and announce that henceforth 50% of all salaries, pensions, transfers, etc. will be paid in Euros and 50% will be paid in newly-issued Españos and also that 1 Españo is equal to 1 Euro in value. Concurrently, the government announces that everyone can now pay 33% of their taxes in Españos and that the minimum wage of €633.30 per month is now 633.3 Españos per month.

So now a bunch of Spanish pensioners, transfer recipients, and public employees are going to have a bunch of worthless Españos in their pockets that they’ll be eager to dump. But firms will be eager to accumulate some Españos in order to pay off their tax bill. So the market will establish some kind of exchange rate between the dear Euro and the cheap Españo, and it’ll make sense for firms and workers to start accepting Españos as payment for this or that. The government is basically simultaneously engaging in monetary expansion, currency depreciation, austerity budgeting, and minimum wage cuts which I think is about as close as a “all the prescriptions from all the schools of thought” solution as Spain is capable of mustering. Since Spain’s heavily indebted private sector has its outstanding debts denominated in Euros, you’ll still have a very nasty problem of unbalanced debt deflation but I don’t see any way around that.

The cheap money should lead to an influx of Northern European tourists, a crash in Spanish consumer purchases of imported goods, and booming exports of Spanish wine. To steal some charts from Martin Wolf the main thing for Spain to recognize is this:

Right now in sovereign debt terms Spain is in okay shape, especially compared to Ireland, Greece, and Portugal. But on the underlying question of labor costs, Spain is in as bad a shape as anyone. Forget the question of whose “fault” the current situation is. Just note that Spain and Germany have seen their labor costs diverge a lot. That means a European Central Bank policy that’s appropriate for Germany won’t be appropriate for Spain. And yet the ECB will make policy that’s deemed appropriate for Germany. So Spain has a big economic problem. And as we’ve been seeing in Ireland, round after round of austerity budgeting if not paired with monetary expansion will (superficially) forestall debt-repayment issues at the price of making the economic problem even worse.

Long story short the voters in Sweden and the UK owe a debt to the politicians who kept them out of the Euro.


Yglesias

Uproar in Spain Over Political Orgasm Video

November 20, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Many in Spain reportedly want to say “Not tonight I have a headache” when it comes to more showings of what is becoming known as the political orgasm video. The BBC reports:

Spanish politicians have criticised a video by the Young Socialists in Catalonia in which a woman simulates an orgasm while casting her vote.

Both Socialist and opposition politicians have attacked the campaign video.

The equality minister called it “misleading” advertising.

In the video the young woman gets increasingly excited as she votes for the Socialist Party in this month’s regional elections in Catalonia.

It concludes with the phrase, “Voting is a pleasure”, after she puts her voting slip in the ballot box.

The leader of the conservative opposition Popular Party of Catalonia, Alicia Sanchez-Camacho, said the video was an “attack on the dignity of women”.

This story will be shocking to Americans of both political parties.

After all, Americans don’t get that excited when they vote (if they do at all). Partisans get excited when they listen to their favorite talk show hosts.


The Moderate Voice

Uproar in Spain Over Political Orgasm Video

November 20, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Many in Spain reportedly want to say “Not tonight I have a headache” when it comes to more showings of what is becoming known as the political orgasm video. The BBC reports:

Spanish politicians have criticised a video by the Young Socialists in Catalonia in which a woman simulates an orgasm while casting her vote.

Both Socialist and opposition politicians have attacked the campaign video.

The equality minister called it “misleading” advertising.

In the video the young woman gets increasingly excited as she votes for the Socialist Party in this month’s regional elections in Catalonia.

It concludes with the phrase, “Voting is a pleasure”, after she puts her voting slip in the ballot box.

The leader of the conservative opposition Popular Party of Catalonia, Alicia Sanchez-Camacho, said the video was an “attack on the dignity of women”.

This story will be shocking to Americans of both political parties.

After all, Americans don’t get that excited when they vote (if they do at all). Partisans get excited when they listen to their favorite talk show hosts.


The Moderate Voice

Brazil’s Rousseff and America’s Obama: An ‘Irresistible Pair’ (El Pais, Spain)

November 19, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Are Brazil’s President-elect Dilma Rousseff and U.S. President Barack Obama capable and ambitious enough to create an alliance that would define the Western Hemisphere in the decades to come? According to columnist Moises Naim of Spain’s El Pais, if President Obama can grab the chance that his predecessor George W. Bush passed up - the potential opportunities would be enormous.

For El Pais, Moises Naim writes in part:

A powerful alliance between Brazil and the United States may be one of the most important geopolitical innovations of our time - and perhaps the most viable. It isn’t that Brazilian soldiers are going to die in arbitrary U.S. wars or that Brasilia would abide by the dictates of Washington. Those times are gone, and the United States can’t even rely on the unconditional support of traditional allies like the British or Canadians.

This is about reaching a series of “very possible” agreements on key issues that are important for both countries as well as the rest of the world. From trade relations to climate change, from financial reform and international trade to nuclear proliferation or the way the world handles the inevitable dislocation caused by the growing economic and political might of China, India, and of course, Brazil. It’s obvious that both countries should make concessions and that for the superpower of the North and the giant in the South, it won’t be easy to accept some of the other’s conditions. But that’s the way things work. It’s vital to understand that these commitments would be a price worth paying to forge an alliance that can have such enormous positive impact.

My suggestion, then, is that Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s next president, make Barack Obama an offer so attractive that he can’t afford the luxury of rejecting it. For many reasons, Obama will be much more receptive to this chance to make history than his predecessor. For Brazilians, this will involve a difficult change: to stop believing that what’s good for the United States is bad for Brazil. Sometimes it is, and the interests of one clash with those of the other; but in many cases - no. In fact, the areas where there are common interests are more numerous and important than those where there are, and will remain, irreconcilable differences.

READ ON AT WORLDMEETS.US, your most trusted translator and aggregator of foreign news and views about our nation.


The Moderate Voice

Spain: Judge rules violent demonstration by Muslims at Córdoba cathedral was not intended to offend religious sentiments

November 13, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

If you review the facts of the case stated below and in initial reports following the incident, you may want to read the judge’s assessment sitting down:

“There isn’t so much an intention to minimize or harm the religious sentiments of the Catholic religion so much as an attempt to favor, not to say clearly impose, in a false gesture of tolerance, the possibility of carrying out joint worship [in the cathedral] … “It doesn’t act to demerit or discredit the Catholic religion, but rather in favor of joint use.”

Nope, nothing to see here. “Violent Muslim Occupation of Church did not Violate Law Against Offending Religious Sentiments: Spanish Judge,” by Matthew Cullinan Hoffman for Lifesitenews, November 10 (thanks to Basil):

CORDOBA, Spain, November 10, 2010 (LifeSiteNews.com) - A Spanish judge has ruled that a violent occupation of the Cathedral of Cordoba by a group of Muslims in March of this year did not violate the nation’s law against offending religious sentiments.

According to Europa Press, the judge occupying the seat of the Fourth Court of Instruction of Cordoba ruled that the incursion into the cathedral, which culminated in an assault on several guards and a policeman, was merely a “public disorder” and was not intended to offend anyone’s religious sentiments.

“There isn’t so much an intention to minimize or harm the religious sentiments of the Catholic religion so much as an attempt to favor, not to say clearly impose, in a false gesture of tolerance, the possibility of carrying out joint worship [in the cathedral],” the judge declared. “It doesn’t act to demerit or discredit the Catholic religion, but rather in favor of joint use.”

Spanish Muslims have long demanded the right to carry out Islamic worship in the Cathedral of Cordoba, which was demolished by Muslims in the 8th century and replaced with a mosque following their conquest of the area. The cathedral was rebuilt in the 13th century after Christians reconquered Cordoba. However, much of the original architecture of the mosque was left intact.

Despite a prohibition against Islamic worship in the cathedral, a group of approximately one hundred Muslims from Austria entered the building during Holy Week on March 31, led by an imam and sporting walkie-talkies. After they began to carry out the rites of the Islamic religion they were confronted by security guards and police, several of whom suffered injuries after being attacked by eight members of the group, one of whom brandished a knife. The eight aggressors were arrested, while the rest were allowed to go free after being forcibly removed from the cathedral.

Jihad Watch

With Pope in Spain, AP’s Winfield Trumpets Gay ‘Kiss-in,’ Misrepresents Catholic Church

November 7, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

The Associated Press' Nicole Winfield is at it again with erroneous and slanted reporting of the Catholic Church. In an article about Pope Benedict XVI's dedication of a basilica in Spain this weekend (Sun. 11/7/10), Winfield writes:

As [the Pope] headed to the basilica, about 200 gays and lesbians staged a 'kiss-in' to protest his visit and church policies that consider homosexual acts 'intrinsically disordered.' Later, a few hundred women marched to protest their second-class status in the church and the Vatican's opposition to birth control.

First: Winfield tells us that "some 250,000" supporters attended the dedication. If there were 200 gay demonstrators, that would represent 0.08% (or 8/10,000ths) of all who were in attendance. At most, this minuscule "kiss-in" merits a passing mention. Yet with the article's headline, "Pope defends family as Spanish gays hold 'kiss-in'," the AP practically gives the gays equal billing.

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NewsBusters.org - Exposing Liberal Media Bias

The Misguided Demonization of the ‘Tea Party’ Movement: ABC, Spain

November 5, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Has the Tea Party movement been unfairly characterized by its political opponents to deflect attention from the truths that it exposes? Once again, a newspaper in Spain has mounted a rare international defense of the what has now become a major force in the Republican Party. You might recall an article headlined How Spain Can Build its Own ‘Tea Party’: Copy Sarah Palin from the publication Hispanidad.

This editorial from Spain’s ABC says in part:

Up until Monday, not a single public opinion survey has improved on the diminished image of the president, from whom his party comrades have fled this campaign season as if he were a biblical plague.

Confronting this evidence, as is often seen in the Spanish media, the easiest recourse is to discredit political movements that have managed to galvanize the campaign. Notably in this case, the Tea Party, which is usually characterized as an ultra-right movement. How easy it is to argue based on labels!

Assuming it was true that this great anti-Obama electoral galvanizer had been a far-right movement, we would have to ask ourselves what went wrong over the past two years for such a movement to emerge out of nowhere. Why, three months after Obama presented his first budget, did this movement in the form of “tea parties” emerge like mushrooms all across the Union to denounce the increase in public spending by 8.4 percent and the federal government’s willingness to subsidize large corporations? And one that is, according to Anglo-Saxon terminology, a libertarian movement - liberal to us - that does nothing to threaten the solid foundations of the great American Republic.

READ ON AT WORLDMEETS.US, your most trusted translator and aggregator of foreign news and views about our nation.


The Moderate Voice

As Americans Expose their Electoral Divisions, Chinese Dictatorship Powers Ahead: El Pais, Spain

October 30, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

As the 2010 U.S. midterm elections head toward their climax, Spanish columnist Lluis Bassets is concerned that while there remains a soft spot in the heart of many people around the world for the United States, its electoral divisions and infighting are looking ever-less appealing compared to China’s ‘well-ordered dictatorship,’ which ‘continues to make decisions that are momentous for us all.”

For Spain’s El Pais, Lluis Bassets writes in small part:

America is great not only for its geographic and demographic dimensions, but for its depth and wealth and its influence as a political model in the world.

U.S. citizens will punish Obama for decisions made by Bush, such as the financial aid offered to distressed banks during the crisis. Moreover, a large fraction of those who received such aid are now financing Obama’s electoral punishment. It’s a chaotic and irrational system of election financing, after the Supreme Court decided to allow unlimited private contributions, treating them as an element of free expression applicable not to individuals, but to corporations. Just as chaotic and irrational, if fearfully efficient, is the radical opposition of the Republican base organized in the Tea Party, a movement directed primarily against taxes and government intervention.

But what this great and chaotic democracy decides will also have huge repercussions around the world. This is due to the presidency, its range of influence and its capacity to act within the international arena. But also to the ideological attitudes and political initiatives for which the U.S. sets the trend: see how the entire world is watching the Tea Party movement?

Up to now, Obama has not been a strong president domestically, where it has cost an arm and a leg to get through health care and financial reform - his two clearest successes. Neither has he shown himself compelling in foreign affairs, where it has proven difficult to impose his vision on the world of emerging new powers like China; or on allies and friends that are too weak - like the Europeans; or on the excessively despotic - like Israel.

While this great and chaotic democracy exposes its weaknesses and infighting to the world, in silence and behind closed doors, China’s huge and well-ordered dictatorship continues to make decisions that are momentous for us all, as it did just 10 days ago at a meeting of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party. … Although the U.S. remains immensely appealing to many of the world’s citizens who would love to have a vote in the election of the American president - and why not? - of representatives and senators, the fact is that what former Prime Minister Felipe González has described as the global fascination with China’s mandarins is also on the rise.

READ ON AT WORLDMEETS.US, your most trusted translator and aggregator of foreign news and views about our nation.


The Moderate Voice

How Spain Can Build its Own ‘Tea Party’: Copy Sarah Palin – Hispanidad, Spain

October 26, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

To those who thought the Tea Party was just an odd American preoccupation, it may be time to think again. According to this article from Spain’s Hispanidad, not only aren’t Sarah Palin and company ‘wing nuts,’ their ideas should be embraced and pursued by Spaniards. After going into significant detail about what a Spanish Tea Party would stand for and pointing out that Spain’s mainstream media is opposed to the idea, columnist Eulogio Lopez suggests that any Spaniard opposed to a Tea Party in Spain ‘doesn’t believe in democracy or the people.’

For Hispanidad, Eulogio Lopez writes in part:

What is the Tea Party? It’s a movement to reinstate citizens as actors in public affairs and instill morality in political action, since, let’s not fool ourselves, the only existing values are Christian values.

How can we do it? By imitating Sarah Palin: with the Internet, TV and buses traveling across Spain.

And who should defend these principles? The small number of parties that defend the non-negotiable values of Pope Benedict XVI (life, family, freedom to educate and the common good) and those politicians that believe in them, from both the PP and the PSOE (Spanish Socialist Workers Party). In other words, non-progressive and non-liberal politicians, which are not and don’t wish to be professional politicians.

The defense of human life from conception to natural death should be the yardstick for identifying Tea Party leaders. And you need not abandon your political party to participate in the movement, provided you are faithful to these non-negotiable principles.

Hey, and what if the Tea Party doesn’t win power? If they don’t, they don’t. The purpose of such a movement can be to reach the prime ministership (why not?). But its principal goal is to regenerate public life. Sarah Palin is still a member of the Republican Party and her goal is the White House. But whether she reaches it or not, she will have regenerated American public life, which has been perverted, not only by Obama’s Democrats, but by Washington’s Republican machine - by professional politicians.

READ ON AT WORLDMEETS.US, your most trusted translator and aggregator of foreign news and views about our nation.


The Moderate Voice

Spain arrests U.S. citizen and Misunderstander of Islam for financing jihad

September 29, 2010 · Posted in The Capitol · Comment 

Former resident of Texas. One wonders if, when he was there, everyone who knew him assumed that he was a “moderate,” and that it would be “Islamophobic” even to consider any other possibility. “Spain arrests American al-Qaida suspect,” by Daniel Woolls for Associated Press, September 29 (thanks to JCB):

MADRID - Spanish police have arrested a U.S. citizen of Algerian origin who is suspected of financing al-Qaida’s North African affiliate, the Interior Ministry said Wednesday.

Mohamed Omar Debhi, 43, was arrested Tuesday in the town of Esplugues de Llobregat near Barcelona. His arrest is not connected to terrorism alerts this week in France and Britain and is just a coincidence, a ministry official said on condition of anonymity in line with ministry rules.

Debhi is suspected of laundering money and sending some of it to an associate in Algeria, Toufik Mizi, to be passed on to cells of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, a ministry statement said. Mizi is wanted in Spain after eluding a police raid in 2008.

The ministry said Debhi used bank transfers or human couriers to send Mizi amounts in excess of euro60,000 ($ 80,000), although it did not specify how much was sent altogether.

The statement said Debhi was “linked to crimes of financing terrorism in the Sahel for al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb,” referring to the vast stretch of sub-Saharan territory where the terror organization has kidnapped several Europeans and other Westerners in recent years….

The Interior Ministry official said Debhi at one point lived in Texas in a town with the postal code 77450. That corresponds to the town of Katy, near Houston. The ministry had no immediate information on when Debhi obtained U.S. citizenship, the official said.

Jihad Watch

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