Currently viewing the tag: "Seeks"

While Republican lawmakers like House Speaker John Boehner (Ohio) continue their efforts to repeal the new health care reform law, last week Vermont moved a step closer to universal health care coverage when the state House of Representatives passed sweeping health care legislation, Said House Speaker Shap Smith (D):

This bill takes our state one step closer to a system that ensures that all Vermonters have access to the care they deserve and contains costs.

The bill, which must still pass the state Senate, would eventually move forward to single-payer system, something that Gov. Peter Shumlin (D) campaigned on last year. Following the vote he said the bill would make Vermont

the first state in the country to make the first substantive step to deliver a health care system where health care will be a right and not a privilege, where health care will follow the individual, not be a requirement of the employer, and where we’ll have an affordable system that contains costs.

The Vermont AFL-CIO, which backed the bill, plans to hold public forums throughout the state to explain the legislation and build support for the bill. Click here for an in-depth look at legislation by Lauren Else at In These Times.

AFL-CIO NOW BLOG

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Fort Lauderdale City Commissioner Charlotte Rodstrom is working on a deal with a pet store to bring a dog park to the central part of the city.

Rodstrom has been talking to the new Pet Supermarket on Sunrise Boulevard and said the store is willing to pay for the creation of a park on a vacant lot that the city owns next door. The city bought the site for a fire station but has no longer plans to use it for that.

The Pet Supermarket is willing to install shade trees, exercise/training equipment , dog water fountains and parking. The city now has a dog park at Snyder Park near Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

Rodstrom said she will bring the idea up at the next City Commission meeting. The park would stay there until the city either finds a use for the property or sells it.

“We have a lot of dogs and pets in the area so it would really be great,” Rodstrom said.

The Lake Ridge neighborhood association and Rodstrom had worked previously to allow a not-for-profit pet rescue group to use the property for exercising dogs that are awaiting adoption.




Broward Politics

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In a letter to President Obama sent today, Speaker of the House John Boehner wrote that he “and many other members of the House of Representatives are troubled that U.S. military resources were committed to war without clearly defining for…



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Lawmakers are considering a bill that would protect the right of the public to photograph or videotape the public activities of police officers.

In an age when even the least expensive cell phones usually come equipped with cameras, supporters say the measure will provide greater transparency while protecting members of the public who record police actions from harassment and arrest.

“There have been numerous incidents…in which citizens have been harassed, threatened and arrested for recording what would seem to be public action by police officers,” state Sen. Martin Looney said at a legislative hearing this morning.

Capitol Watch

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Airstrikes continue while Obama seeks to resolve command impasse

Top news: Western airstrikes appear to have silenced the pro-Qaddafi forces engaged in shelling the town of Misrata. The town have been under constant bombardment, but the firing of artillery stopped after two bombinbs by allied planes this morning. At least two explosions were also heard in Tripoli this morning. Western warplanes have now flown more than 300 sorties over Libya and fired 162 Tomahawk missiles.

In an apparently live television broadcast, Muammar al-Qaddafi vowed not to surrender and called the western powers carrying out the airstrikes "a bunch of fascists who will end up in the dustbin of history."

On Tuesday, President Obama called President Nicolas Sarkozy of France and Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain in an attempt to resolve an impasse over command of the mission. The U.S. plans to cede control of the mission within days but France has been resistant to having NATO take the primary coordinating role. The emerging deal would western forces rely on NATO assets but not flag the mission as a NATO-one to avoid alienating Arab countries. 

Japan: The Japanese government estimates the cost of rebuilding could be as much as $ 309 billion. 

A radiation spike in Tokyo’s tap water has prompted new fears about food contamination.  


Middle East

  • Syrian security forces opened fire into a crowd of demonstrators in the Southern Syrian city of Daraa. 
  • Egypt’s stock market reopened after two months, falling almost 9 percent.  
  • Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh has reportedly offered to step down at the beginning of next year.  
  • Israeli security forces are trading fire with Palestinian militants in Gaza.

Asia

  • Afghan President Hamid Karzai again urged the Taliban to join peace negotiations and pleaded with them to stop attacking schools. 
  • China sentenced seven to death for unrest in Xinjiang. 
  • India’s government is introducing new reform measures in response to growing corruption allegations. 

Africa

Americas

  • President Obama has left El Salvador, cutting his trip to Latin America short by a few hours. 
  • Obama pledged $ 200 million to fight drug trafficking in Central America. 
  • Former Cuban leader Fidel Castro says that he resigned as head of Cuba’s communist party five years ago. 

Europe

  • Former Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma was officially named as a suspect in the killing to an investigative journalist. 
  • Portugal’s embattled minority government is expected to be defeated in a parliamentary vote today. 
  • Italy’s interior minister is traveling to Tunisia for talks aimed at stopping the flow of migrants across the Mediterranean. 

PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images

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(CNN) - The growing push to restrict the collective bargaining rights of government employees has reached the far-flung state of Alaska.

There, a Republican state lawmaker has introduced legislation that would strip many public employees of the right to collectively bargain for hours, benefits and working conditions. State employees could still collectively bargain for wages under the legislation.


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(CNN) - The growing push to restrict the collective bargaining rights of government employees has reached the far-flung state of Alaska.

There, a Republican state lawmaker has introduced legislation that would strip many public employees of the right to collectively bargain for hours, benefits and working conditions. State employees could still collectively bargain for wages under the legislation.

The bill exempts firefighters, police officers and emergency medical technicians, who, according to Title 40 of the Alaska Statutes, are prohibited from going on strike.

The bill’s sponsor, state Rep. Carl Gatto, R-Palmer, could not be reached for comment. Neither could members of the Republican House leadership. A woman who answered the phone listed for Gatto’s Wasilla office said the lawmaker would be unavailable for comment Monday.

Gatto has told various news outlets that his bill mimics legislation that was passed by the Wisconsin Legislature earlier this month, signed into law and is now the subject of a lawsuit in that state. Gatto has said, like the Wisconsin measure, his proposal aims to curb state costs.

Similar bills to limit collective bargaining rights also are pending in Ohio and Indiana.

Opponents of the bill give the measure little chance of passing this session. That’s because the 2011 session of the Alaska Legislature is roughly two-thirds over, they said.

Also, opponents said, Alaska lawmakers have been focused on controversial legislation to roll back the state’s oil and gas tax on profits earned by petroleum companies in the state.

House minority leader Beth Kerttula, D-Juneau, said Gatto’s bill “would be a particularly onerous thing to drop on state employees.”

Kerttula said public employees are still smarting from a 2005 overhaul of the state’s retirement, pension and health care system. Kertulla called the switch “a disaster” in a state that has a difficult time retaining qualified teachers and police officers.

Kerttula also said the bill would face tough sledding in the state Senate, where unlike the GOP-controlled House, the balance of power between Republicans and Democrats is evenly divided. Kertulla, nevertheless, said the Democratic minority leadership is taking the bill seriously.

State Rep. Berta Gardner, D-Anchorage, who is the House minority whip, wondered whether the proposed collective bargaining bill for Alaska public employees could spark as fierce an argument as Wisconsin’s, which prompted 14 Democrats to leave the state in an unsuccessful effort to kill that bill.

“If the Democrats flee here,” Gardner said, “we’ll have to go to Canada.”


CNN Political Ticker

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Sharron Angle (R) opened her Nevada congressional campaign by doing the unexpected — she actually took questions from reporters, the Reno Gazette Journal reports.

“The tea party favorite, who has referred to the media as the ‘lame stream’ media, held a question and answer session with Nevada journalists Monday for nearly an hour. She took all questions, including those about the perception that she ran from reporters in her campaign against U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, how she thinks she can win after three unsuccessful attempts at federal office and why she thinks she can come back after such a devastating loss in 2010.”
Taegan Goddard’s Political Wire

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(Jonathan H. Adler)

Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen appealed the decision by a county judge enjoining publication of legislation that would curtail collective bargaining rights for public employees.  The AG’s petition, filed with a state appellate court, seeks leave to appeal and a stay of the county judge’s temporary restraining order.  The Journal-Sentinel reports:

In its appeal Monday, the state made several arguments. First, the state argued that the court has no jurisdiction over GOP legislative leaders being sued or over La Follette because they all currently enjoy legal immunity.Second, the state argued that the court can’t block a bill that hasn’t yet been published into law because that amounts to interfering with the Legislature in its area of responsibility of passing laws.

Last, the state argued that the courts can’t block or strike down a law passed by the Legislature purely on the basis of lawmakers failing to follow the rules of the lawmaking process such as legislative rules or the open meetings law. State Supreme Court decisions have found that the courts can only strike down or block laws when the Legislature has failed to follow constitutional requirements, the state said in its appeal.




The Volokh Conspiracy

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Guatemala’s constitution prohibits members of a president’s extended family from running for the presidency, the BBC reports, so the country’s first lady is ending her eight-year marriage so she can seek to succeed her husband as president.
Taegan Goddard’s Political Wire

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The University of Connecticut is seeking a tuition increase of 2.5 percent for the next academic year, and the school trustees are expected to vote on the increase next week.

Capitol Watch

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In written testimony submitted to the Senate Armed Services Committee on Mar. 15, General David Petraeus briefly outlined Afghanistan’s efforts to reconcile some Taliban forces.

ISAF has “provided assistance for new Afghan government-led initiatives in reintegration, supporting the recently established Afghan High Peace Council and Provincial Peace and Reintegration Councils,” General Petraeus wrote. ISAF has counted “some 700 former Taliban” who “have now officially reintegrated with Afghan authorities,” as well as “some 2,000 more [who] are in various stages of the reintegration process.”

Later in his testimony, General Petraeus explained that “hundreds of reconcilable mid-level leaders and fighters have been reintegrated into Afghan society.”

While significant, such efforts have, to date, convinced only a small percentage of the estimated 25,000 to 35,000 Taliban fighters who form the backbone of the Afghan insurgency to lay down their arms.

Moreover, the Afghan High Peace Council is reportedly seeking to include high-level Taliban commanders held at Guantanamo in peace talks even though there is no evidence that they are reconcilable.

In February, the council made it known that it was seeking the release of Mullah Khairullah Khairkhwa, who was formerly the Taliban’s governor of Herat province. Earlier this month, Dawn reported the names of three other Taliban leaders held at Guantanamo whom the peace council seeks to include in the reconciliation talks.

They are: Abdul Haq Wasiq (the former Taliban Deputy Minister of Intelligence); Mullah Norullah Noori (the Taliban’s former governor-general of Afghanistan’s northern zone); and Mullah Mohammad Fazl (the Taliban’s former army chief of staff).

All four of the Taliban leaders are long-time mujahedeen who began serving the Taliban in the early to mid-1990s and rose to high-ranking positions in Mullah Omar’s organization. At least three of the four (Noori, Fazl, and Khairkhwa) have been designated by the United Nations as members of the Taliban and as such have had their assets frozen.

All four, according to declassified files produced at Guantanamo, also have noteworthy ties to al Qaeda.

Abdul Haq Wasiq, Taliban Deputy Minister of Intelligence (internment serial number 4)

During his combatant status review tribunal (CSRT) at Guantanamo, US military officials read the key allegation against Wasiq aloud: “The Detainee was the Taliban Deputy Minister of Intelligence.” Wasiq did not deny the charge. Instead, he replied:

Yes, I was this, and I will tell you why. Before the Taliban captured Kabul, I was in Quetta, Pakistan, studying. When I came home, the Taliban came and recruited people by force to Kabul. …I confessed this, and I will confess again. My job was against thieves and bribes; I was fighting against those kinds of people.

Wasiq, therefore, implied that he was conscripted into becoming a high-ranking Taliban intelligence official who merely fought crime (a “police job,” as he called it). This is a dubious claim to say the least. And one of the tribunal members challenged Wasiq’s excuse: “I would think it would be most difficult for a farmer and religious student to suddenly become Deputy Minister of Intelligence with no background and no training.”

Another allegation was read aloud at the hearing: “The Detainee used a radio to communicate with the Taliban Chief of Intelligence.” Wasiq again did not deny it, admitting that the head of the Taliban’s intelligence service was his boss, but claiming that they communicated by radio only “way before September 11th in America.” Wasiq explained:

He [the Taliban Chief of Intelligence] was in charge of the intelligence, and was the governor of the whole province. I did not call him; he called me on the radio because he was in charge of us. He gave us our jobs to do, and we couldn’t do anything without his order. You know if you have a boss you have to listen to him.

As deputy of the Taliban’s intelligence service, Wasiq surely had knowledge of al Qaeda’s training camps in Afghanistan. When asked if he knew about six al Qaeda training facilities outside of Kabul, however, Wasiq feigned ignorance:

I don’t know. I swear to Allah that this is the first time from your mouth that there were six training camps outside of Kabul. I heard from you there were al Qaida training camps. I don’t know, I just now heard this from you now.

Wasiq also claimed that he “didn’t have a connection” to al Qaeda and knew nothing about al Qaeda members inside Afghanistan. US military and intelligence officials clearly did not buy his denial.

According to one source cited in the US government’s declassified files, Wasiq was both “an al Qaeda intelligence member and the Taliban Deputy Minister of Intelligence.” In a letter to his brother, Wasiq reportedly “included greetings to an al Qaeda member.” (During his CSRT, Wasiq denied authoring such a letter.)

Wasiq also allegedly “arranged for an Egyptian al Qaeda member to come to Kabul, Afghanistan, to teach personnel in the Taliban Intelligence Service about intelligence.”

Another unnamed “individual” cited in the government’s memos reported that Wasiq “requested he head up a directorate within the Taliban Intelligence to watch Arab Islamists not affiliated with al Qaeda” because the Taliban was worried “that the extremists intended to harm Osama bin Laden.”

Wasiq allegedly conspired with other members of the al Qaeda-Taliban jihadist network, too. Wasiq “interrogated a pair of ethnic Chechen[s],” and when he learned of their “connection with Chechen Fundamentalists” he delivered a “briefcase containing 100,000 United States Dollars” to them for “fighting the Russians.” In another instance, Wasiq appointed a high-ranking member of Hezb-i-Islami Gulbuddin (HIG) to a Taliban intelligence position.

Wasiq was captured in Afghanistan in late 2001. At the time, US officials allege, he was “involved in the [Taliban's] operation to re-establish the front lines of Kunduz, Afghanistan.” Wasiq denied this during his CSRT, saying that he was merely a “civilian” Taliban worker.

Mullah Norullah Noori, former governor-general of Afghanistan’s northern zone (ISN # 6)

A May 22, 2002 declassified State Department cable, available on George Washington University’s National Security Archive web site, describes Mullah Norullah Noori as “a strong military and civil figure in the northern zone.” He served as the former “governor of Balkh and Governor-General of Northern Zone,” which included several Afghan provinces, and was also the interim governor of Mazar e Sharif “in the absence of the Taliban governor of that province.”

Noori “fought alongside al Qaeda as a Taliban military general, against the Northern Alliance” in September 1995, according to declassified files prepared at Guantanamo.

Noori’s alleged al Qaeda ties did not end there. He “hosted al Qaeda commanders” and also “met a subordinate of Osama bin Laden to pass a message from the Taliban supreme leader” - that is, a message from Mullah Omar.

In addition, Noori allegedly “held a meeting with the head of the Islamic [M]ovement of Uzbekistan, who discussed jihad in Uzbekistan.” (This IMU head is likely Juma Namangani, who was killed in late 2001.)

During hearings at Guantanamo, Noori described himself as a simple farmer and tailor, who never took up arms even after he began working for the Taliban. “I was just like a servant and also like a security guard,” Noori claimed.

Of course, the Afghan High Peace Council’s reported interest in Noori belies his claim. The council reportedly believes that high-ranking Taliban commanders held at Guantanamo can assist in reconciliation efforts. And US officials do not think that Noori was a non-violent, low-level Taliban “servant” either.

Noori was “fighting on the front lines at Mazar e Sharif” when the Taliban fell to the Northern Alliance, according to declassified military documents. He then allegedly “moved with a majority of the remaining fighters to Kunduz, Afghanistan to reestablish the front lines,” before he helped negotiate the surrender of Taliban forces to General Dostum.

Noori was detained and transferred to Guantanamo in early 2002. The Gitmo files note that Taliban fighters loyal to him continued to fight into at least 2003.

Mullah Mohammad Fazl, Taliban army chief of staff (ISN #7)

Mullah Mohammad Fazl was one of the Taliban’s most experienced commanders prior to his capture in Nov. 2001. During his CSRT at Guantanamo, Fazl said he could not “remember the exact year and time” he started working for the Taliban, but it was “[b]efore they captured Kabul.” Declassified US military memos note that Fazl studied at a Madrasa for several years until “he joined the Taliban at the request of the principal and director of the Madrasa.”

American officials recognized that Fazl was an important Taliban leader shortly after Mullah Omar’s forces captured Kabul. In a declassified Oct. 4, 1996 State Department cable, available on the George Washington University’s National Security Archive web site, Fazl is listed as a member of the Taliban’s Interim Shura council. Another declassified State Department cable, dated May 22, 2002, labels Fazl “a key Taliban commander,” who “[p]articipated in all significant operations.” Fazl also had “a long record of human rights abuses.”

The State Department’s assessment of Fazl is corroborated by sources cited in the declassified Gitmo files. One unnamed source said that “a former Taliban supreme leader” - that is, Mullah Omar - “considered [Fazl] his top soldier.” In addition, a declassified memo reads: “In the war against the Northern Alliance, the detainee was responsible for widespread atrocities against noncombatants.”

Along with thousands of Taliban fighters, Fazl surrendered to the Northern Alliance in late 2001. “After we went to Mazar e Sharif to talk with General Dostum and his commander, we came to this agreement to surrender all the weapons, and after that, we will let everyone go home,” Fazl explained during his CSRT. Fazl tried to downplay his Taliban role, however, saying he commanded a contingent of fighters that was much smaller than the US government concluded.

The declassified Gitmo files outline Fazl’s ties to the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU), a terrorist organization closely allied with al Qaeda. In the memos, US officials allege that Fazl “was aware the Taliban was providing the [IMU] with financial, weapons, and logistic support in exchange for IMU providing the Taliban with soldiers.”

At some point during his time in custody, Fazl told authorities that “his direct commanders were the Taliban Defense Minister and a person who was responsible for foreign troop deployment.” That second person was allegedly IMU’s “military commander,” which is likely a reference to Juma Namangani. US officials concluded that “the bulk of funding for IMU comes directly from Osama bin Laden.”

An unnamed source cited in the declassified Gitmo files also told US officials “that at its peak, a specific Taliban army division was composed for 1,100 foreign fighters” and this division “received its orders from” Fazl as well as the Taliban’s Minister of Defense. The foreign fighter “division received all their funding and logistical support from the Taliban Ministry of Defense.”

Although the foreign fighter division is not named in the files pertaining to Fazl, it is likely the Arab 055 Brigade, which was led by top al Qaeda operative Abdul Hadi al Iraqi (who is also currently detained at Guantanamo) and tightly integrated with Taliban forces.

Mullah Khairullah Khairkhwa, former governor of Herat province and acting interior minister (ISN # 579)

The Long War Journal has profiled Khairullah Khairkhwa previously. [See LWJ reports, Iran and the Taliban, allies against America and Afghan peace council requests release of Gitmo detainee.]

A declassified Dec. 30, 1997 State Department cable describes Khairkhwa as the “acting minister of interior,” who “maintains responsibilities for the Taliban’s civilian intelligence organization.” Khairkhwa “also reports directly to [Mullah] Omar,” the cable reads.

Another declassified State Department cable, dated Apr. 7, 1998, reports that Khairkhwa is one of several Taliban leaders who are “known to be close to Mullah Omar.”

In 1999, Khairkhwa was appointed governor of Afghanistan’s Herat province, and he held that position until the Taliban fell in late 2001. US officials allege in memos prepared at Guantanamo that Khairkhwa became a major drug trafficker with ties to senior al Qaeda leaders.

Khairkhwa reportedly built three walled compounds that he used to manage his opium trade. And he allegedly oversaw one of Osama bin Laden’s training facilities in Herat as well. One US government memo notes that only Khairkhwa or bin Laden himself “could authorize entrance” to the facility, which was one of bin Laden’s “most important bases” and “conducted terrorist training two times per week.”

During hearings at Guantanamo, Khairkhwa denied these allegations. But it is clear that US intelligence officials did not believe Khairkhwa’s denials. The allegations were repeatedly included in memos prepared for Khairkhwa’s case.

Khairkhwa admittedly played another, more provocative role as well. According to the US government’s unclassified files, Khairkhwa was installed as the governor of Herat “to improve relations between Iran and the Taliban government” after hostilities between the two boiled over during the late 1990s.

In the hearings at Guantanamo, Khairkhwa admitted that he began meeting with the Iranians in early 2000. The US government’s unclassified documents cite at least two instances when Khairkhwa took part in meetings between senior Taliban and Iranian officials — once before and once after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Khairkhwa admitted that he set up security for the meetings.

At these meetings, according to the US government’s declassified files, the Iranians “pledged to assist the Taliban in their war with the United States.”

1 The Long War Journal

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Our guest blogger is Sandy Bogar, a health care policy intern with the Center for American Progress Action Fund.

As a Madison native, I have experienced conflicting feelings for the last several weeks. I continue to be inspired by Wisconsinites rallying and denouncing the budget repair bill that the Republican Senators passed without the consent of their Democratic colleagues. This bill is a political attack on Wisconsin citizens’ rights and not, in fact, an attempt to ameliorate the State deficit challenges.

Yet disappointingly there has been a complete lack of action on Walker’s proposed reforms to Wisconsin’s Medicaid program. A fifth of all Wisconites — more than 1.2 million people — rely on BadgerCare. Walker and the state’s GOP are trying to put control of the program in the hands of Walker’s conserative appointees.

Walker’s proposed budget would give the state’s Health Services secretary Dennis Smith, who has called on states to drop Medicaid altogether, the authority to “to override state Medicaid laws as [he] sees fit and institute sweeping changes” including reducing benefits and limiting eligibility. According to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, the bill would essentially silence the voices of Wisconsin citizens when future changes to Medicaid are made:

Consequently, Wisconsin residents who normally get a chance to voice their views to the state legislature on proposed changes to BadgerCare — e.g., changes to who gets coverage, what benefits they receive, and how much doctors and hospitals get reimbursed — would have to find some way to influence the governor. That could prove disastrous for the more than 1.1 million low-income children, seniors, people with disabilities, and adults who rely on BadgerCare for their health coverage, and the providers that serve them.

As with the cuts made to collective bargaining, this represents a clear rights violation, not an attempt to fix the State budget. Medicaid recipients represent the most vulnerable populations in the State and Wisconsin currently maintains some of the most well-respected Medicaid programs in the nation. This bill threatens to further marginalize our state’s poor, elderly, and disabled citizens and downgrade a public health system that has assisted residents for more than twenty years.

Wonk Room

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Our guest blogger is Sandy Bogar, a health care policy intern with the Center for American Progress Action Fund.

As a Madison native, I have experienced conflicting feelings for the last several weeks. I continue to be inspired by Wisconsinites rallying and denouncing the budget repair bill that the Republican Senators passed without the consent of their Democratic colleagues. This bill is a political attack on Wisconsin citizens’ rights and not, in fact, an attempt to ameliorate the State deficit challenges.

Yet disappointingly there has been a complete lack of action on Walker’s proposed reforms to Wisconsin’s Medicaid program. A fifth of all Wisconites — more than 1.2 million people — rely on BadgerCare. Walker and the state’s GOP are trying to put control of the program in the hands of Walker’s conserative appointees.

Walker’s proposed budget would give the state’s Health Services secretary Dennis Smith, who has called on states to drop Medicaid altogether, the authority to “to override state Medicaid laws as [he] sees fit and institute sweeping changes” including reducing benefits and limiting eligibility. According to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, the bill would essentially silence the voices of Wisconsin citizens when future changes to Medicaid are made:

Consequently, Wisconsin residents who normally get a chance to voice their views to the state legislature on proposed changes to BadgerCare — e.g., changes to who gets coverage, what benefits they receive, and how much doctors and hospitals get reimbursed — would have to find some way to influence the governor. That could prove disastrous for the more than 1.1 million low-income children, seniors, people with disabilities, and adults who rely on BadgerCare for their health coverage, and the providers that serve them.

As with the cuts made to collective bargaining, this represents a clear rights violation, not an attempt to fix the State budget. Medicaid recipients represent the most vulnerable populations in the State and Wisconsin currently maintains some of the most well-respected Medicaid programs in the nation. This bill threatens to further marginalize our state’s poor, elderly, and disabled citizens and downgrade a public health system that has assisted residents for more than twenty years.

Wonk Room

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Watch out NRSC.

Senator DeMint is seeking to make more of an impact come 2012. He is trying to enlarge his Senate Conservatives PAC and raise more money, to bring in a more conservative

 

Liberty Pundits Blog

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