Currently viewing the tag: "ProIslamic"


The BBC would have been better off with this version

Multiculturalism and dhimmitude abetting Islamic supremacism: “Beyond Belief,” from Biased BBC, January 18 (thanks to George):

Following Five Guys Named Mohammed, broadcast over 5 days at the start of the year, last night Radio 4 gave us Young, Muslim and Black:

Dotun Adebayo looks at why Islam is providing an attractive religious alternative to Christianity for Black Britons seeking answers.

Next Monday you can tune in for It’s My Story: The Imam of Peace:

Nadene Ghouri profiles the work of John Butt, an English Muslim convert who became an imam and is trying to spread a message of peace and tolerance across Pakistan and Afghanistan.

And Face the Facts on 27th Jan will be devoted to the issue of “whether sections of the British press are increasing tensions within communities by publishing negative stories about Muslims.”

Across the first four weeks of 2011, no programmes or series on BBC Radio 4 will have been wholly devoted to any of the other non-Christian religious communities of the U.K. Yes, Hindus, Jews, Jains, Sikhs and Buddhists have all gone uncatered for by the allegedly diversity-loving BBC. Only Islam seems to interest the channel’s programme makers….

What a surprise.

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Whitewashing jihad, engaging in witless moral equivalence. “Australian Anglican Archbishop Ripped over Pro-Islamic Stand,” by David W. Virtue for Virtue Online, December 9 (thanks to Benedict):

The leader of the Australian Anglican Communion, Archbishop Phillip Aspinall condemned attacks on Christians and Muslims in Pakistan in the December issue of FOCUS, the newspaper of the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane, but came under attack from a leading Anglican layman calling his muted remarks about Islamic persecution of Christians “very misleading and mischievous.”

“This Advent season, our prayers are with the Christians of Iraq, the Muslims of Pakistan and all those subjected to violence. May the light and peace of the Christ Child shine afresh in the darkness of our world and our hearts,” wrote Aspinall. “The light shines in the darkness. Attacks, like those endure recently by both Christians and Muslims, have often strengthened relationships between Christian and Muslim moderates in Iraq and in other parts of the world. It is a sign of hope, a glimpse of the new creation.”

Following publication of the editorial, Brendan Theodore wrote a letter to Aspinall blasting the archbishop saying that while Muslims in Pakistan have been attacked is true - it is a sect war by fellow Muslims, “cleverly choosing not to mention this, implies that perhaps it may have been another religion responsible.

“Christians all over the world face persecution for following their faith like Aasia Bibi - the Christian in Pakistan who faces the death penalty for allegedly blaspheming Allah, families of western journalists who have been executed by extremist Muslim groups, clergy who “fall” for the belief that Sharia law can be tolerated by Christians in any way, shape or form. Also our armed forces overseas who are facing a very difficult time as well as their families….

“These are the Muslims in Pakistan which you will be praying for - is it that they may see the light of grace, truth and compassion or your warm fuzzy, I want to be friends with everyone” style of Christianity regardless of their violent and vitriolic message some of them promulgate?” queried Theodore.

“Is this the ultimate act of betrayal by a Christian leader who is willing to ignore the plight of a solitary Christian standing up for her faith while toeing the all too familiar politically correct “niceness” and tolerance of small ‘c’ Christianity.”…

Theodore said he found Aspinall’s comment about praying for the Muslims in Pakistan “ironic and puzzling, given their aggressive hatred of anything that supposedly offends the Koran. Pro-Taliban cleric Maulana Yousef Qureshi an Islamic cleric has offered half a million Rupees for Aasia’s death.”

“No president, no parliament and no government has the right to interfere in the tenets of Islam. Islamic punishment (according to Muslim jurisprudence) will be implemented at all costs,” said Maulana Qureshi. “We will strongly resist any attempt to repeal laws which provide protection to the sanctity of Holy Prophet Muhammad (PBUH),” Qureshi is reported to have told a rally.

“So who is facing the death penalty, certainly not Muslims? Aspinall would like to “swan” the world stage as a religious tolerance diplomat, sprouting green, sustainable policies - thinking that he has invented “stewardship of God’s creation”. Sadly he does not display such tolerance towards orthodox, conservative clergy in this country.”

“What angers/annoys/frustrates me so much is that so many liberal clergy pander to the other religions and will brush off, ignore or treat lightly those of the Christian faith who are persecuted on a daily basis in many parts of the world,” concluded Theodore.

Another observer noted that this is yet another manifestation of the profoundly disingenuous liberal doctrine of “equivalence” - having heard of the law of physics, that every action has an opposite and equal reaction, they apply this to politics and religion so that for every Christian persecuted or murdered, they must find an example of a Muslim similarly mistreated, and so present a “balanced” view of what has happened.

“As the article shrewdly notes, however, the persecution and massacres being perpetrated against Muslims in Pakistan are not the work of Christians, but of Muslims, who think nothing of suicide-bombing one another’s mosques and murdering their politicians.

“There is no equivalence between the two religions. One is the manifestation of the living Christ and the kingdom which he is building, with every soul he saves. The other is a brutal ideology, fixed in aspic and in anger in the 7th century by its inventor, who specialized in barbarity and booty when not busy synthesizing his own new religion with its violent sanctions against all who might oppose it then and in the future.”

Fixed in aspic and in anger!

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The Texas State Board of Education today passed a resolution warning textbook publishers to scrub their books of “gross pro-Islamic, anti-Christian” bias. The vote was 7 to 6.

The board passed the nonbinding resolution after more than three hours of debate.

Proponents of the measure, including board members and witnesses, argued that world history textbooks spend too much space discussing Islam, and in too positive a light, when compared with Christianity.

One parent said she read through a section of her son’s history book and found four pages on Islam and only one reference to the Bible. Asked by a board member what the section was titled, she replied, “Life in the Eastern Hemisphere.”

One of the board’s most conservative members, Don McLeroy, who is serving the last months of his term, said textbook publishers have been biased in favor of Islam for years. He argued that “one of the greatest gifts to the world was medieval Christendom,” citing an essay he had written in 2002 titled “The Gift of Medieval Christendom to the World.”

Board rules dictate that members can’t discuss books that are currently approved for Texas public schools. Therefore, they had to limit their discussion to books either no longer in use, or hypothetical future books.

Opponents of the resolution said they agreed with the resolution’s ostensible purpose, to make sure all the major world religions were treated fairly in textbooks. But, they argued, the resolution only mentioned “pro-Islamic, anti-Christian distortions.”

“That’s offensive language,” said board member Lawrence Allen. “You’re trying to use one religion over another, and I don’t think that’s what we’re trying to do here.”

Opponents tried to amend the language to leave out references to Islam and Christianity. That motion failed, 6 to 7.

They also argued that the resolution itself inaccurately described information in textbooks, and moved to postpone a vote until November in order to do more research. That motion also failed.

One woman who argued in favor of the resolution cried out, “I believe Middle Easterners have bought the textbooks! They’ve bought everything else here!” She said Middle Eastern publishers should be required to proclaim their pro-Islam bias.

“I’m biased in favor of Christianity,” she said. “I’m biased in favor of America!”

Although the resolution was nonbinding, Texas school board decisions garner attention because, as one of the country’s largest markets, textbook makers have traditionally written their books, sold nationally, to the Texas standards. (Although there’s an argument that Texas no longer has so much sway.)

“Publishers are listening today,” said one conservative board member, David Bradley. “And they’re very sensitive to it.”









Islam - Board of education - Christianity - Religion and Spirituality - Texas
TPMMuckraker

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What is often lost in this discussion is the idea that the Board has the right and duty to exercise quality control over the content of its textbooks, and it would be reasonable for any such body to be concerned about bias, double standards, and agenda-driven statements in those books. The problem that responsibility is encountering here is Islam’s already privileged status, where anything but accolades is to be met with knee-jerk accusations of the worst possible intentions, so as to shut down the discussion and silence dissent.

An update on this story. “Texas ed board adopts resolution limiting Islam,” from the Associated Press, September 24:

AUSTIN, Texas — The Texas State Board of Education adopted a resolution Friday that seeks to curtail references to Islam in Texas textbooks, as social conservative board members warned of what they describe as a creeping Middle Eastern influence in the nation’s publishing industry.

The board approved the one-page nonbinding resolution, which urges textbook publishers to limit what they print about Islam in world history books, by a 7-5 vote.

Critics say it’s another example of the ideological board trying to politicize public education in the Lone Star State. Kathy Miller, president of the Texas Freedom Network, which advocates for religious freedom, questioned why the resolution came at a time when “anti-Muslim rhetoric in this country has reached fever pitch.”

From that, you’d think those of us who criticize Islam’s teachings were rampaging in the streets, setting fire to piles of tires, hurling stones at government buildings, and calling for bloodshed.

Not us. But that’s precisely what has happened in Afghanistan over a Qur’an burning that never happened, and even the rumor of burnings.

“It’s hard not to conclude that the misleading claims in this resolution are either based on ignorance of what’s in the textbooks or, on the other hand, are an example of fear-mongering and playing politics,” Miller said.

Future boards that will choose the state’s next generation of social studies texts will not be bound by the resolution.

“This is an expression of the board’s opinion, so it does not have an affect on any particular textbook,” said David Anderson, the general counsel for the Texas Education Agency, when asked by a board member what legal weight the resolution would carry.

“So this is a cosmetic exercise?” asked board member Mavis Knight, a Democrat from Dallas.

The resolution cites world history books no longer used in Texas schools that it says devoted more lines of text to Islamic beliefs and practices than Christian ones. Chairwoman Gail Lowe said the resolution cites old books because board rules prohibit them from discussing current books more than 90 days after their adoption.

“I believe that it’s happening in the current (social studies books) even though we can’t cover that in the resolution,” said board member Terri Leo, a Republican from Spring. The resolution sends a “clear message to publishers that it should not happen in the future.”

The resolution also claims “more such discriminatory treatment of religion may occur as Middle Easterners buy into the U.S. public school textbook oligopoly, as they are doing now.” [...]

The resolution concludes by warning publishers the “State Board of Education will look to reject future prejudicial social studies submissions that continue to offend Texas law with respect to treatment of the world’s major religious groups by significant inequalities of coverage space-wise and by demonizing or lionizing one or more of them over others.”

Eminently reasonable concerns.

Jihad Watch

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The Texas State Board of Education today passed a resolution warning textbook publishers to scrub their books of “gross pro-Islamic, anti-Christian” bias. The vote was 7 to 6.

The board passed the nonbinding resolution after more than three hours of debate.

Proponents of the measure, including board members and witnesses, argued that world history textbooks spend too much space discussing Islam, and in too positive a light, when compared with Christianity.

One parent said she read through a section of her son’s history book and found four pages on Islam and only one reference to the Bible. Asked by a board member what the section was titled, she replied, “Life in the Eastern Hemisphere.”

One of the board’s most conservative members, Don McLeroy, who is serving the last months of his term, said textbook publishers have been biased in favor of Islam for years. He argued that “one of the greatest gifts to the world was medieval Christendom,” citing an essay he had written in 2002 titled “The Gift of Medieval Christendom to the World.”

Board rules dictate that members can’t discuss books that are currently approved for Texas public schools. Therefore, they had to limit their discussion to books either no longer in use, or hypothetical future books.

Opponents of the resolution said they agreed with the resolution’s ostensible purpose, to make sure all the major world religions were treated fairly in textbooks. But, they argued, the resolution only mentioned “pro-Islamic, anti-Christian distortions.”

“That’s offensive language,” said board member Lawrence Allen. “You’re trying to use one religion over another, and I don’t think that’s what we’re trying to do here.”

Opponents tried to amend the language to leave out references to Islam and Christianity. That motion failed, 6 to 7.

They also argued that the resolution itself inaccurately described information in textbooks, and moved to postpone a vote until November in order to do more research. That motion also failed.

One woman who argued in favor of the resolution cried out, “I believe Middle Easterners have bought the textbooks! They’ve bought everything else here!” She said Middle Eastern publishers should be required to proclaim their pro-Islam bias.

“I’m biased in favor of Christianity,” she said. “I’m biased in favor of America!”

Although the resolution was nonbinding, Texas school board decisions garner attention because, as one of the country’s largest markets, textbook makers have traditionally written their books, sold nationally, to the Texas standards. (Although there’s an argument that Texas no longer has so much sway.)

“Publishers are listening today,” said one conservative board member, David Bradley. “And they’re very sensitive to it.”









Islam - Board of education - Christianity - Religion and Spirituality - Texas


TPMMuckraker

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The Texas Board of Education, whose decisions can set textbook standards for the entire country, is now trying to take on the “Muslim propaganda” in world history books.

The social conservatives on the board, who earlier this year set new standards requiring textbooks to include sections on anti-Equal Rights Amendment crusader Phyllis Schafly, the Contract with America and the Christian beliefs of the Founders, want to pass a resolution warning textbook makers not to include “gross pro-Islamic, anti-Christian distortions” in their books.

According to board member Ken Mercer, many world history books are rife with such “Muslim propaganda.”

“One of the books I reviewed has 120 lines referencing Christian beliefs, but has 248 lines referencing Muslim beliefs,” Mercer told WOAI News Radio.

A draft of the resolution obtained by the Dallas Morning News reads, in part, that “diverse reviewers have repeatedly documented gross pro-Islamic, anti-Christian distortions in social studies texts,” including “sanitized definitions of ‘jihad’ that exclude religious intolerance or military aggression against non-Muslims … which undergirds worldwide Muslim terrorism.”

This is in part due, the resolution argues, to “Middle-Easterners” infiltrating the textbook market.

“More such discriminatory treatment of religion may occur as Middle Easterners buy into the U.S. public school textbook oligopoly, as they are doing now,” it reads. As the Dallas Morning News pointed out, “They offered no specific evidence of such investments.”

The books the conservatives reference have also been out of Texas schools since 2003, as one Republican board member pointed out.

Because Texas has such a large public school system, the standards the state board sets have often been used by textbook manufacturers for the books they sell throughout the country. However, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in May that other states shouldn’t be concerned: “Textbook companies today have a real ability to customize textbooks.”

The board will vote on the resolution next week, when the board meets in Austin.

(H/T Think Progress)









Islam - Board of education - Religion and Spirituality - Social conservatism - Christian


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texasboardIn its battle against historical accuracy, the right-wing Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) decided to revamp the state’s social studies curriculum earlier this year, exchanging emphasis on the historical roles of Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln with the roles of confederate leader Jefferson Davis and paranoid right-wing pundit Phyllis Schlafly. But “just when it appeared the State Board of Education was done with the culture wars,” SBOE is now deciding to dictate what students should learn about Islam.

SBOE’s “seven-member social conservative bloc” will bring up a resolution next week that “would warn publishers not to push a pro-Islamic, anti-Christian viewpoint in world history textbooks.” The resolution demands textbook publishers no longer “taint” Texas textbooks with “gross pro-Islamic, anti-Christian distortions” and “false editorial stereotypes” that “still roil” certain textbooks used across the U.S.:

A preliminary draft of the resolution states that “diverse reviewers have repeatedly documented gross pro-Islamic, anti-Christian distortions in social studies texts” across the U.S. and that past social studies textbooks in Texas also have been “tainted” with pro-Islamic, anti-Christian views.

The resolution cites examples in past world history books – no longer used in Texas schools – that devoted far more lines of text to Islamic beliefs and practices than to Christian beliefs and practices.[...]

The resolution states that pro-Islamic, anti-Christian half-truths, selective disinformation and false editorial stereotypes “still roil” some social studies textbooks nationwide, including “sanitized definitions of ‘jihad’ that exclude religious intolerance or military aggression against non-Muslims … which undergirds worldwide Muslim terrorism.” [...]

The resolution concludes with the warning to publishers that the “State Board of Education will look to reject future prejudicial social studies submissions that continue to offend Texas law with respect to treatment of the world’s major religious groups by significant inequalities of coverage space-wise and by demonizing or lionizing one or more of them over others.”

SBOE member Ken Mercer, who leads the conservative bloc, pushed to consider the resolution because he found that the textbooks’ “Islamic references are very positive to the point that it is whitewashed, while the references to Christianity are very negative.” Other board members charge that the resolution combats a sinister plot by “Middle Easterners” who “are investing in U.S. textbook companies to push their views.”

Some parents worry that the resolution will “prevent their kids from learning the facts.” Board member Pat Hardy, however, suggests that “the issue may be moot because none of the world history books cited by [the resolution] are still in use in Texas, having been replaced in 2003.”

And even if the resolution is adopted, “it would not bind future boards, which will choose the next generation of social studies textbooks within a few years.” SBOE’s conservative bloc also lost two of their own, including the resolution’s author, in March’s Republican primary and thus will be diminished when new members are seated next year. Still, the anti-Islam resolution may sway publishers as “Texas is one of the largest markets for school textbooks in the country,” and so “many publishers write the books using Texas standards, and then sell the same books to public schools in dozens of other states.”

Think Progress