Posts Tagged: ‘Bump


21
Dec 10

Bump On The Chris Christie Bandwagon

The Chris Christie bandwagon may have hit a speed bump - at least a small one - based on results from two new polls released today.

The polls, from Quinnipiac and Rutgers-Eagleton, show Christie’s approval rating in New Jersey slipping a bit, with significant majorities skeptical that he’d make a good president or vice-president. The polling shows that Christie is one of the most polarizing governors in recent New Jersey history, with more voters holding both a very favorable view of him and an extremely negative view.

The slippage comes as his national profile continues to rise (his “60 Minutes” interview the latest in the media blitz), and as he’s taken on the state Supreme Court for being excessively liberal.

The Quinnipiac survey shows Christie with a 46 percent job approval rating, with 44 percent disapproving. That’s down from his 51 percent approval rating last month. He also now holds a net negative rating on education, with 45 percent approving and 49 percent disapproving of his reform efforts, taking on the teachers’ unions and educational establishment in the process.

For the first time in many months, Obama’s approval rating has inched ahead of Christie’s. The president’s approval in New Jersey is now at 50 percent, up four points from last month - and the first time he’s gotten majority approval since June.

The Rutgers poll found 39 percent giving Christie positive ratings, with 54 percent rating him negatively. The 28 percent of voters who consider his job performance “poor” is the second-highest for any first-year governor in the history of the poll.

And despite all the presidential buzz (which he’s aggressively denied), even his supporters are skeptical that he’d be a good fit in the White House. Only 25 percent of voters said he’d make a good president - and just 50 percent of Republicans - with 63 percent disagreeing. Only 32 percent thought he’d make a good vice president.

The Quinnipiac poll was conducted Dec. 14-19, among 1,276 registered voters, for a margin of error of +/- 2.7%. The Rutgers-Eagleton poll was conducted earlier in the month, from Dec. 2-6. The Rutgers poll surveyed 906 adults, for a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Hotline On Call


30
Nov 10

Miami Heat coach Spoelstra downplays LeBron bump - MiamiHerald.com


Washington Post
Miami Heat coach Spoelstra downplays LeBron bump
MiamiHerald.com
A literal run-in between LeBron James and his coach, a players-only meeting and now an unnamed source questioning the team's direction: The periphery of an otherwise innocuous game against the Washington Wizards has snowballed into a
NBA: LeBron James leads Miami Heat over Washington WizardsSan Jose Mercury News
LeBron hurting himself by undermining coachFOXSports.com
James and His Coach Deny a RiftNew York Times
ESPN -Reuters -msnbc.com
all 1,768 news articles »

Sports - Google News


29
Nov 10

LeBron James, Spoelstra downplay bump in the (Saturday) night - Sun-Sentinel


New York Daily News
LeBron James, Spoelstra downplay bump in the (Saturday) night
Sun-Sentinel
At least the bump between coach Erik Spoelstra and forward LeBron James during a third-quarter timeout Saturday in Dallas. Amid the Heat's overall struggles, and particularly struggles in that loss to the
James, Heat coach Spoelstra have pregame meetingSI.com
Miami heat threatening to bring master plan to ashesCBSSports.com
NBA PM: Spoelstra Failing MiserablyHoopsWorld
NBA.com -New York Daily News -USA Today
all 1,328 news articles »

Sports - Google News


29
Nov 10

Erik Spoelstra downplays LeBron ‘bump - USA Today


Kansas City Star
Erik Spoelstra downplays LeBron 'bump
USA Today
Erik Spoelstra says the bump he got from LeBron James during a Miami Heat timeout on Saturday night was simply incidental contact, not a sign of dissension. "I didn't even notice it until people mentioned it after the game," Spoelstra told the South
LeBron James, Heat Unifying Nation in Unexpected WaysFanHouse
Erik Spoelstra Reportedly Frustrating HeatSan Francisco Chronicle
Tracy McGrady calls out lack of chemistry between LeBron, WadeSportingNews.com
Vancouver Sun -NESN.com -Yahoo! Sports (blog)
all 1,274 news articles »

Sports - Google News


29
Nov 10

Spoelstra downplays ‘bump,’ friction inside Heat locker room - Orlando Sentinel


CBC.ca
Spoelstra downplays 'bump,' friction inside Heat locker room
Orlando Sentinel
Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra strongly downplayed reports of internal conflict within the team and termed innocuous the bump he received from forward LeBron James during a third-quarter timeout Saturday in
Haters, rejoice! Heat struggles delighting manySeattle Times
Haters, rejoice! Heat struggles delighting manyUSA Today
Tracy McGrady calls out lack of chemistry between LeBron, WadeSportingNews.com
ESPN -MiamiHerald.com -Yahoo! Sports
all 1,147 news articles »

Sports - Google News


28
Nov 10

Did LeBron James deliberately bump Heat coach Erik Spoelstra? - USA Today


Washington Post
Did LeBron James deliberately bump Heat coach Erik Spoelstra?
USA Today
Did a frustrated LeBron James go out of his way to bump Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra during the Heat's loss to Dallas Mavericks Saturday night? Or did a ticked-off Spoelstra deliberately try to walk through the King — sending a message both to
Miami Heat hold players-only meeting after (latest) disappointing lossProBasketballTalk
Heat's stars losea little luster early onWashington Post
Mavericks keep the Heat in a funkLos Angeles Times
Dallas Morning News -MiamiHerald.com -msnbc.com
all 911 news articles »

Sports - Google News


20
Sep 10

Most Economists Want All Tax Cuts Extended; CNN’s Roberts Sees Need to ‘Bump Up’ Govt’s ‘Revenue Stream’

A new CNN/Money survey of 31 top economists found a majority of them say the top priority — given the weak state of the economy — is for Congress to extend the Bush tax cuts for all income groups. But talking about this policy recommendation with CNN/Money’s Paul La Monica on Monday’s American Morning, co-anchor John Roberts rued the conundrum of needing to keep tax rates low for economic reasons — putting “more money in the pockets of people” — while at the same time, because of the “frightening” trillion-dollar deficits, “you’ve got to bump up your [the government’s] revenue stream.” Roberts fretted:

You want to put more money in the pockets of people, particularly when you look at unemployment over 9 percent. But then at the same time you have these deficits that are running at an absolutely frightening rate of a trillion-plus dollars a year. So, you’ve got to bump up your revenue stream but at the same time you want to keep your money coming into the economy. So how do you reconcile that calculation?

It seems not to have occurred to Roberts that the way to avoid either monstrous deficits or suffocating tax increases is to reduce government to a more affordable size.

Looking at the details of CNN’s survey of economists, it’s understandable why they would want the tax cuts extended. Their average forecast is for unemployment to be just below 9% at the end of next year, a full fifteen months from now, with a quarter of those surveyed seeing the unemployment rate still at 9.5% or higher in December 2011.

As for the consequences of letting the tax cuts expire, just today, the Heritage Foundation released a comprehensive study showing that the tax hikes envisioned by President Obama would lead to slower economic growth, lower family income, higher interest rates and a loss of an average of 600,000 private sector jobs each year from 2011 through 2020, or 6 million fewer jobs total.

Liberals are already trying to frame the deficit debate as one of making sure government has the money it needs to pay for the vast expansion President Obama and congressional Democrats achieved over the past 19 months. A fair and balanced news media would put much of the onus on liberals to backtrack on their massive spending commitments before requiring the beleaguered private sector to kick in an even greater share.

Here’s the exchange during the 8am ET hour of CNN’s American Morning, September 20:

JOHN ROBERTS: Seventeen minutes now after the hour. We have 110 days until the Bush tax cuts are set to expire and the debate over whether to extend them has absolutely consumed Capitol Hill. The strongest impact will most certainly be felt in the bank accounts of millions of Americans.

CANDY CROWLEY: Minding your business this morning, CNN/Money’s Paul La Monica. President Obama is suggesting that the tax cuts should expire only for the richest 3 percent of taxpayers but there are economist who say that may not be the best idea. [turns to La Monica] So, is it?

PAUL LA MONICA: Yeah, we surveyed 31 leading economists and a majority, 18 of them, said that their top priority if they were a Washington policymaker would be to extend the tax cuts for everyone.

ROBERTS: So in terms of extending the tax cuts and what that does for the economy, run the numbers for us. You have got an example here.

LA MONICA: Yeah. You have a middle class family, $ 75,000, you know, two children, you would have about $ 2600 in higher taxes if the cuts are not extended.

ROBERTS: So — for the average family that’s a lot of money, but particularly in these hard economic times, when you know you are worried about, ‘Am I going to keep my job,’ ‘Should I buy that,’ — to not to get hit with an extra bill of $ 2600, that’s substantial.

LA MONICA: Definitely, that’s why I think there is such urgency in Washington to get something done. It does seems that the main issue is, obviously, just trying — whether or not to extend them for everyone or to exclude the wealthiest top percent of the country. I mean a lot of people both Democrats and Republicans think that extending it for the middle class is obviously the right thing that has to be done, particularly in these tough times.

CROWLEY: You know those tax cuts are already in place, so I’m going to assume that keeping them doesn’t really change the job market, it simply — the argument is [if they expire] things will get worse for America.

LA MONICA: Exactly. It’s similar to two years ago when the financial crisis was really first starting to take hold, a lot of things that Washington or you know, was hoping to do right now is preventing the economy from deteriorating any further. I mean we’ve had obviously hopes of a recovery earlier in the year that have started to fade this summer. And that’s worrying a lot of people on obviously, you know, in Washington and on Wall Street.

ROBERTS: So when you look at the calculation, Paul, you’ve got your rock and you’ve got your hard place. The rock being you want more money coming in to the economy itself so you want to put more money in the pockets of people, particularly when you look at unemployment over 9 percent. But then at the same time you have these deficits that are running at an absolutely  frightening rate of a trillion-plus dollars a year. So, you’ve got to bump up your revenue stream but at the same time you want to keep your money coming into the economy. So how do you reconcile that calculation?

LA MONICA: Yeah, that’s very difficult. It’s the classic short-term versus long-term solution right now that people are trying to weigh. What is more important? A lot of people that we have spoken to at CNN/Money say that really Washington has to do everything in their power to help the middle class extending these tax cuts is likely something that can do that even though it could add to the deficit in the short-term. The hope, and admittedly it is something that could bear out over time but you know, you don’t know for certain is that if the economy starts to finally pick up some steam and consumers spend more, primarily because maybe they aren’t getting this bigger tax hit, the deficit could help take care of itself, because a stronger economy leads to higher tax revenue from not just individuals but businesses over the long haul.

CROWLEY: Paul, thanks so much for breaking it down. Appreciate it.

NewsBusters.org - Exposing Liberal Media Bias